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The link between childhood obsessions and brain development




A child looks at dinosaur models at an exhibition at the Zhejiang Natural Museum in Hangzhou in China's eastern Zhejiang province on International Children's Day on June 1, 2017.
A child looks at dinosaur models at an exhibition at the Zhejiang Natural Museum in Hangzhou in China's eastern Zhejiang province on International Children's Day on June 1, 2017.
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Whether it’s watching Peter Pan every day after school or rattling off the scientific names and traits of countless dinosaurs, it’s common for children to form extreme attachments to subjects, narratives or objects at a young age.

But it turns out these “intense interests,” as scientists call them, can also help kids develop stronger attention spans and information processing skills as they increase their knowledge.

What is your kid currently fascinated by? What were you obsessed with during your childhood? And did it end up leading you toward a passion or career later in life, or did you move on to other interests?

Guest:

Elizabeth Chatel, a marriage and family therapist in Norwalk, Conn.; she tweets @ElizabethChatel