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What are the consequences of a net neutrality repeal for consumers?




Demonstrators rally outside the Federal Communication Commission building to protest against the end of net neutrality rules December 14, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Demonstrators rally outside the Federal Communication Commission building to protest against the end of net neutrality rules December 14, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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The Federal Communications Commission has repealed net neutrality with a 3-2 vote on Thursday.

For the past few years, there’s been contentious debate over the net neutrality, or a set of Obama-era rules approved by the FCC in 2015 aiming to keep the internet open and fair. This means internet service providers were banned from creating fast and slow “lanes” of online traffic.

The now Republican-led FCC is hoping the repeal will increase competition, spurring innovation. But net neutrality supporters are worried that lifting the regulations will give providers too much power.

Some players in the tech world are worried about how the change would affect fledgling businesses. Consumer advocates are also against overturning net neutrality, arguing that this rise in competition will come at the expense of broadband customers.

What are your thoughts on net neutrality? Does it help or hurt business competition? And what are the consequences for consumers?

Guests:

Steve Effros, cable industry analyst and lawyer based in Virginia and former president of Cable Telecommunications Association, an industry trade association.

Andrea Belz, vice dean of technology, innovation and entrepreneurship at USC's Viterbi School of Engineering; she leads the effort for the National Science Foundation’s Innovation Corps entrepreneurship activities in Southern California which cultivates startups at USC, UCLA and Caltech