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As sexual misconduct scandals mount, a look at the future of workplace romance




Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff arrives with his girlfriend, Alisha Kramer, at a campaign office as he runs for Georgia's 6th Congressional District on April 15, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia.
Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff arrives with his girlfriend, Alisha Kramer, at a campaign office as he runs for Georgia's 6th Congressional District on April 15, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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Office relationships have always been tricky.

But new human resource standards to put the kibosh on sexual misconduct may also be squashing workplace romances. While the line between harassment and dating should be obvious, employees starting a relationship should be extra vigilant about actions at work. And for some who aren’t socially apt in their approach to asking a coworker out, the new climate could stop them from pursuing a date altogether.

Couples meeting at work isn’t anything new. As we spend more and more time connected to our jobs, the chances of meeting a significant other in the next cubicle or while working with a superior or subordinate is a definite possibility. The question is, what’s the right way to make love connections when horror stories about sexual misconduct have put human resources on high alert?

Guest:

Lisa Brown Alexander, CEO of consulting firm Non-Profit HR