Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Hollywood studios’ answer to the #MeToo movement: morality clauses in contracts




Victims of sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual abuse and their supporters protest during a #MeToo march in Hollywood, California on November 12, 2017.
Victims of sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual abuse and their supporters protest during a #MeToo march in Hollywood, California on November 12, 2017.
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

18:56
Download this story 13.0MB

The public fallout of major entertainment players from Kevin Spacey to Harvey Weinstein in the #MeToo era has some studios scrambling to add broad morality clauses to their contracts.

Hollywood morality clauses go back as far as the 1920s, when the notorious Fatty Arbuckle scandal and its following trial rocked the entertainment world. Since then, their popularity and importance has ebbed and flowed with societal values and current events – and the recent rise of the internet and 24/7 news cycle had already increased their prevalence before the #MeToo movement took off last fall.

If you work in the entertainment industry, what has been your experience with morality clauses? Have you been able to negotiate more specific terms than “conduct that results in adverse publicity or notoriety”? Would you sign a contract so broad in the current industry atmosphere?

Call us at 866-893-5722.

Guest:

Tim Cedrone, labor and employment law attorney at Apruzzese, McDermott, Mastro & Murphy, P.C. in New Jersey and adjunct professor at Seton Hall University; he previously served as the chair of the Entertainment, Arts and Sports Law Section of the New Jersey State Bar Association