Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

After Trump’s speech at the National Prayer Breakfast, a look at Trump’s history with Evangelicals




President Donald Trump speaks at the National Prayer Breakfast on February 8, 2018 in Washington, DC.
President Donald Trump speaks at the National Prayer Breakfast on February 8, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Pool/Getty Images

Listen to story

22:48
Download this story 16.0MB

This morning, President Trump spoke at the National Prayer Breakfast in front of a gathering of different Christian leaders, praising God and the intersection of faith and American values.

Many in the audience were Evangelical Christians, who are a crucial part of Trump’s base. On the heels of his speech, we examine Trump’s relationship with the Evangelical community – the more liberal Evangelicals who have denounced Trump, as well as the more conservative core that has been willing to overlook Trump’s personal behavior in favor of his rhetoric.

Why does Trump have such strong support from the Evangelical community? What has been their relationship with conservative candidates and politics throughout U.S. history? And more broadly, how has faith intersected and influenced U.S. politics?

Guests:

Tommy Givens, assistant professor of New Testament Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary; his research interests include theological ethics, political theory and the history of Christianity in U.S. politics

Marie Griffith, professor and Director of the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University in St. Louis; her recent book is “Moral Combat: How Sex Divided American Christians and Fractured American Politics