Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Budget-win or budget-bust? A look at what’s in that sweeping government funding bill




House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, a Republican from California, leaves the House Chamber following a vote to fund the U.S. Government on February 9, 2018 in Washington, DC.
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, a Republican from California, leaves the House Chamber following a vote to fund the U.S. Government on February 9, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Listen to story

15:06
Download this story 10.0MB

President Donald Trump signed a $400 billion budget deal early Friday morning, ending what’s reported to be the shortest government shutdown on record, just before the official work day began.

The shutdown, which lasted from 12:01 a.m. to about 5:30 a.m. Friday, was triggered by GOP Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky after he objected to adding $1 trillion to the federal deficit in 2019.

But the bipartisan short-term funding agreement also brings relief of compromise. Military spending will go up about $80 billion for each of the next two fiscal years, non-defense accounts about $60 billion per year, plus an additional $90 billion in disaster aid for recent wildfires and hurricanes.

Other notable boosts include securing 10 years of CHIP funding and a 65-page-long list of extended tax breaks that were close to expiration.

For more on the bill’s specifics and overall impact, we’ll get the latest from a Washington reporter and hear from two economic experts.

Guests:

Seung Min Kim, congressional reporter for Politico; she tweets @seungminkim

Donald Marron, economist and fellow at the Urban Institute where his research focus includes federal budgeting; he was acting director of the Congressional Budget Office in 2006; he tweets @dmarron

Chris Edwards, economist and director of tax policy at the Cato Institute; he is also editor of the Cato project DownsizingGovernment.org, which focuses on federal spending; he tweets @CatoEdwards