Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

To build or not to build: The future of development planning on Tejon Ranch




The San Andreas Fault, visible as the line between grey metamorphic quartz monzonite and brown sedimentary sandstone and siltstone, is seen at Tejon Pass
The San Andreas Fault, visible as the line between grey metamorphic quartz monzonite and brown sedimentary sandstone and siltstone, is seen at Tejon Pass
David McNew/Getty Images

Listen to story

18:53
Download this story 9.0MB

The plan to build a community in northern L.A. County’s Tejon Ranch has been debated for years.

At this week’s Regional Planning Commission hearing, a conversation was sparked again. As the Los Angeles Times reports, Tejon Ranch’s proposed Centennial development plan would create a 12,000 acre site, complete with 20,000 new homes and schools, parks and a sheriff’s station.

This could be good news for Angelenos in the midst of the county’s housing crisis. It could also mean relief for nearby residents who commute far distances for work and to reach schools, parks and libraries.

But environmental groups opposing the plan argue that it would hurt air quality, endanger wildlife such as the California condor and impact grasslands. There are also concerns about earthquake fault lines and fire risks in the area. The Centennial development is one of three plans at Tejon Ranch that have been on the table since 1999.

The Regional Planning Commission will vote on the project in July. If approved, it will head to the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors for the final greenlight.

Guests:

Barry Zoeller, vice president of corporate communications and investor relations at Tejon Ranch Co.; the company is behind the Centennial development project

Ileene Anderson, senior scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental advocacy nonprofit, her focus includes protecting endangered species