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Solving the world’s water shortage... by hauling a giant iceberg to its thirstiest regions




Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland.
Icebergs that calved from glaciers are seen on June 3, 2017 in Jokulsarlon, Iceland.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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A company in United Arab Emirates is looking to haul a giant iceberg from the Antarctic to either Australia or Africa in an effort to provide drinking water to one of these two water-starved places.

The journey, which is expected to launch in November, is about 4,000 miles; the endeavor will cost an estimated $60 million. The idea is not entirely new, and similar plans had circulated back in the 1970s.

How would it work — and what could possibly go wrong? Larry talks to our guests about the idea.

Guests:

David Cox, freelance science writer for NBC who has been covering the story; he tweets @dcwriter89

Christopher Readinger, head of the antarctic team at the U.S. National Ice Center, an agency that provides worldwide navigational ice analysis for the armed forces of the United States, allied nations, and U.S. government agencies