All Things Considered for Sunday, August 18, 2013

Cars In America: Is The Love Story Over?

America once had a love affair with the automobile. But a new study shows just how much air has been let out of those tires, and the millennial generation seems to be ambivalent toward owning cars or even acquiring driver's licenses.

Killed For Taking Part In 'Everybody's Fight'

This summer, NPR is airing several reports looking at watershed moments in the Civil Rights movement. Several Civil Rights advocates who died pursuing equality left behind devastated families, especially children. While immensely proud of their parents, many report it was a struggle to grow up in the shadow of a martyred hero. This story originally aired on All Things Considered on Aug. 12, 2013.

Do The Courts Have A Right To Name Your Baby?

A Tennessee judge ordered a couple to change their 7-month-old son's name from "Messiah" to "Martin," ruling that, "Messiah' is a title that is held only by Jesus Christ." Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Don Gonyea talks with Slate.com's Dahlia Lithwick about what parents can do and when courts can intervene.

Kentucky Church Allows Pooches As Parishioners

Church is a place where people go to worship, reflect and get away from the daily grind. A church in Paris, Ky., takes that a step further. They allow people to bring their dogs to church. Leslie Guttman of member station WEKU reports.
Anna Kendrick's version of the song "Cups" is the number six song in the country right now, even though the movie the song was originally featured in came out last year. So just how did the song become such a phenomenon? Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Don Gonyea and Vulture's Amanda Dobbins help explain the evolution of the song.
Debbie Macomber's books don't get a lot of critical attention, but they've sold in the hundreds of millions. Her fans feel like they know and love the woman behind the words, so her publisher threw a party for them.

A Dystopian View Of America's 'Fallen' Suburbs

Patrick Flanery's taut new novel, Fallen Land, delves into the housing crisis, creeping corporate surveillance and a "crisis of neighborliness" in American life. The backdrop: a half-built and crumbling subdivision outside of an unnamed American city.
Last year, country superstar Vince Gill left his record label, MCA, after more than 20 years. But he's leaving with one last album — a love letter, really — dedicated to the classic country songs of his youth. Titled Bakersfield, it finds Gill working with pedal-steel master Paul Franklin.
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