All Things Considered for Sunday, October 20, 2013

Some very mainstream scientists are saying that the climate change situation is so bad that saving life as we know it might require something radical: like shooting chemicals into the stratosphere or to protect earth from the sun or sucking carbon dioxide from out of the atmosphere.
Washington State has finalized rules for recreational marijuana sales, joining Colorado in beginning to create a legal framework for the pot industry. Randy Simmons, deputy director of the Washington Liquor Control Board, says other states and even other countries are watching Washington's developing system very closely.

Climate Watcher Says He's Done With Flying

Meteorologist Eric Holthaus has made his career monitoring the Earth's climate, and he's alarmed at what he sees. After reading a new, bleak international report on climate change, Holthaus has decided one important way to reduce his carbon footprint is to give up airplane travel for good.

For The Ultimate Getaway, Why Not South Sudan?

You may not find South Sudan at the top of most dream destination lists, but the authors of a new travel guide say the young country, long isolated by a violent civil war, has much to offer tourists in search of wildlife, culture and natural beauty.

What's Creepy, Crawly And A Champion Of Neuroscience?

The new RoboRoach project allows users to influence the movements of cockroaches with a smartphone. Greg Gage of Backyard Brains says it's not brain control but more like the bridle of a horse. The RoboRoach just provides a sensation that makes the cockroach perceive an obstacle.
Actor Barkhad Abdi plays the ruthless leader of Somali pirates in the film Captain Phillips. To train for the role, Abdi learned how to swim, handle weapons, drive a skiff — and act.
In The Pure Gold Baby, a budding anthropologist raises a developmentally disabled child and confronts the challenges of middle age. This is a surprise comeback for author Margaret Drabble, who swore in 2009 that she'd never publish fiction again.
The sitar-playing daughter of the late Ravi Shankar discusses teaming up with her half-sister, Norah Jones, on the new album Traces of You. Hear how their collaboration elicited an unexpected echo of their father's work, a sign that they were meant to work together.
Find an archived Episode: