All Things Considered for Sunday, October 27, 2013

In Southern California and communities from St. Louis to Seattle, millions of Americans live in areas at risk for earthquake. But many have not taken simple steps to protect themselves — and seismologist can only provide limited warning.
Over the past week, prosecutors gave closing arguments in the case against Nuon Chea and Khieu Samphan, two top members of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge regime. Host Arun Rath speaks with journalist Elizabeth Becker about the U.N. tribunal trying the Khmer Rouge members for war crimes. Becker covered the conflict in Cambodia in the 1970s and was one of the few journalists to enter the country while the Khmer Rouge was in power. She is the author of When the War Was Over: Cambodia and the Khmer Rouge Revolution.
Driving through the low-lying community of Lindenhurst, on New York's Long Island, you see house after house lifted up on pilings, 12 feet in the air. Superstorm Sandy put Lindenhurst under 8 feet of water, and many homeowners lost everything. For many, lifting a house has become the go-to solution.
Families who can't afford diapers sometimes re-use disposable diapers. That practice leads to many other problems for families living in poverty, according to a Yale study. Host Arun Rath talks with Joanne Goldblum, a social worker and an author of the study. She is also the founder and executive director of the National Diaper Bank Network.
Leading Oscar contenders are under fire as award season approaches. Journalist Scott Feinberg recently wrote in The Hollywood Reporter about the trash-talking that spreads before the Oscars to take down perceived front-runners. He talks to NPR's Arun Rath about a campaign against Captain Phillips and why such efforts often backfire.
Women and Children First has weathered more than three decades of competition from chain stores and online booksellers to become one of the largest feminist bookstores in the U.S. Now, the Chicago store is among the few of its kind left standing — and it's on the hunt for new ownership.
Daniel Alarcon's new novel is set in an unnamed, war-scarred Latin American country. The protagonist, Nelson, is an aspiring playwright — though he doesn't pursue his dreams with much diligence. Alarcon discusses his own views on working as an artist and his creative process.

Lou Reed, Beloved Contrarian, Dies

An American rock musician born in Freeport on Long Island, N.Y., Lou Reed epitomized New York City's artistic underbelly in the 1970s, with his songs about hookers and junkies. Reed was 71.
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