All Things Considered for Monday, November 25, 2013

White House: Iran Deal Delays Potential Nuclear Weapon

Officials from the U.S. and five world powers reached a deal with Iran over the weekend to curb its nuclear program. Melissa Block speaks with Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes about the deal.

John Kerry: Risk Ready And Looking For A Legacy

Secretary of State John Kerry has been diving into difficult issues ever since he took up the office at Foggy Bottom. He's managed tough negotiations with Afghan President Hamid Karzai over a future, limited role for U.S. troops there. He's re-launched Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, reached a deal with Russia to rid Syria of chemical weapons and is now making headway with Iran to roll back that country's nuclear program. This is a man clearly looking for legacy.
For a second consecutive season, Derrick Rose finds himself sidelined with a season-ending injury. He tore the medial meniscus in his right knee in a game against Portland Friday. On Monday, the Chicago Bulls confirmed the injury will likely keep him from playing this season. Rose missed last season following surgery on his left knee.

Rep. Issa Takes Anti-Obamacare Campaign To The States

On Monday, Republicans held the second of at least four planned hearings designed to focus on health insurance price increases. GOP Rep. Darrell Issa, the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, blames the problem on the Affordable Care Act.
The strains caused by the botched Affordable Care Act roll out have made the president's already challenging relationships with Congress even more problematic.

Can Child Marriages Be Stopped?

Across the developing world, 1 in 3 girls marries before age 18. Some are wed and become mothers by the time they reach their teens. In Malawi, some villages have started to punish parents who marry off their young daughters.

'Long Day In November' Back Again After Long Time Gone

Alan Cheuse reviews A Long Day in November by Ernest Gaines. It's a children's book that was originally published in 1971 and has just been re-released.
Ohio Attorney Gen. Mike DeWine announced Monday that four more adults, including the superintendent of Steubenville's schools, were indicted on charges related to the alleged attempt to cover up a teenage girl's 2012 rape. Two members of the high school football team were found guilty of the rape in March. Last month, the head of technology for the school system was accused of tampering with evidence.

What Do We Mean When We Talk About 'Latino Art'?

The question of categorizing art by ethnicity or gender is at the center of a very public debate surrounding a new show at the Smithsonian called "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art."
The Obama administration says one of the most important gains in the Iran nuclear deal is that it will buy time for negotiations on a more permanent agreement. If no such agreement is reached, sanctions that have been suspended could be re-imposed. But analysts say the obstacles to a final agreement are still huge, and it may not be easy to regain the leverage that sanctions have achieved so far.
Newly announced talks on ending the conflict in Syria will bring together representatives of the Syrian government and opposition groups. U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon announced that the talks would convene on Jan. 22.
A report on the Newtown, Conn., school shooting released Monday says we may never know what motivated Adam Lanza to kill twenty children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School nearly a year ago. The long-awaited summary report from the Connecticut State's Attorney mentions that Lanza was a troubled young man who didn't seem to connect with people. He did not share his plans with anyone before the rampage. The report rules out criminal prosecution and closes the case. It was shared with Newtown family members before being released to the public.
The Food and Drug Administration has sent a warning letter to the company 23andMe demanding that its saliva test be taken off the market. The company claims the test can detect the genetic likelihood of more than a hundred diseases — a claim the FDA says the company has not proved sufficiently.
Hondurans went to the polls this Sunday to elect a new president. The Central American country has a whole host of problems to deal with, including the highest levels of violence in the world and increased drug cartel activity. Most pressing, though, the new leader will inherit a failing economy. Honduras is broke. It just borrowed, for the first time, $500 million on the international bond market, but that wasn't even enough to bail the country out of its devastating financial troubles.
Seniors aged 65 and over represent one of the fastest growing age groups to use social media. But what drives them to do so, and what kinds of technology can help their experience? Audie Cornish speaks with Dr. Laura Carstensen, who heads the Stanford Center on Longevity, for more on the culture of seniors and technology.

Helping Low-Income Seniors Build A Social Web Online

More older Americans are going online, but many seniors don't have the resources, devices or skills to navigate the Web. One pilot program is giving tablets and training to seniors to help them combat isolation while staying safe online.
Previous estimates of the climate-warming gas were based on the rough number of methane-emitting sources on the ground — such as factories, refineries, stoves, swamps, landfills and cattle herds. But by directly measuring levels of methane in the air instead, a new study puts the total much higher.

'Divided & United': Songs Of The Civil War Re-Imagined

NPR's Melissa Block talks with producer Randall Poster and historian Sean Wilentz about a new collection of music. Poster brought together stars and legends spanning many genres and generations to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.
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