All Things Considered for Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Is Easing Iran Sanctions The Right Move?

Much of the criticism of the interim nuclear deal reached with Iran Sunday has focused on the sanctions relief Iran will receive over the next six months if it follows through on restricting its nuclear program. Although the only irreversible relief being offered is a gradual release of $4.2 billion in frozen Iranian revenue, critics warn that the "architecture of the sanctions regime has been undermined." Analysts say all the important sanctions hampering Iran's economy remain in place, but the announcement of the deal itself is having a psychological impact on markets. Asian energy importers will be looking to benefit, as will Turkey and Dubai.

Iran Nuclear Deal Will Allow 'Unprecedented' Inspection

The six-month agreement struck between Iran and Western nations last weekend lays out a detailed plan of inspection for Iran's nuclear facilities. The White House calls it "unprecedented transparency and intrusive monitoring." So how will that work? Melissa Block speaks with Dr. David A. Kay, former U.N. Chief Weapons Inspector, to find out.
How about a nice, juicy moose burger with your venison? Wild-game suppers are a rural American harvest tradition dating back to Colonial times. This year, 800 people turned out for the long-running "Superbowl" of these suppers, where hunters donate most of the meat (with some roadkill thrown in).

Colo. Fracking Votes Put Pressure On Energy Companies

Voters in three Colorado communities passed measures this month limiting the practice of hydraulic fracturing. A close vote in a fourth community means a recount next week. Companies say the measures are creating an uncertain business environment.
Katie Couric's leap to Yahoo! has been hailed as a landmark and criticized as an awkward misstep. But Eric Deggans sees in both Couric and Yahoo! media brands struggling to find a way forward.
The Obama administration is pushing new regulations that will make it harder for so-called "social welfare" tax-exempt groups to influence elections.
Major stock indexes have shot to record highs in the U.S. this year, gaining more than 20 percent, and yet economic growth remains at disappointing levels. A lot of analysts say the Federal Reserve's stimulus efforts are behind the stock boom and a possible bubble.
The Rev. Kelvin Apurillo rode out Haiyan on the second floor of his parish church. Two-thirds of his parishioners are now dead, missing or have left, and he's struggling to make sense of the destruction. In the majority Roman Catholic country, the church has played a key role in relief efforts.

Trove Of Artifacts Trumpets African-American Triumphs

More than 35 years ago, Bernard and Shirley Kinsey began acquiring documents, artifacts and artworks that tell the story of the African-American experience. The collection, which spans more than 400 years, spotlights not black pain, they say, but the strength and resilience of African-Americans.

Susan Stamberg's Other Favorite Holiday Cranberry Dish

Every year, on Thanksgiving, Susan Stamberg recalls a cranberry relish recipe that's now infamous in public radio land. But another cranberry dish has also graced her holiday table through the years — a cranberry chutney that is sweet, tart and packs a kick of cayenne pepper.
President Obama's Affordable Care Act will be back before the Supreme Court this spring. This time, the issue is whether for-profit corporations citing religious objections may refuse to provide contraceptive services in health insurance plans offered to employees.
Even as the Supreme Court takes up the issue of emergency contraception coverage, a new study suggests the most popular form of the drug might not work for most American women. It seems one formulation of the popular drug loses effectiveness in women who are obese or who weigh over a certain amount.
Audie Cornish speaks with Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga., who is vice chair of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, about the Iran deal.
The United States military flew two B-52 bombers into air space that China recently designated as an air defense identification zone. The showdown is part of a larger dispute involving China and Japan and territorial rights in the East China Sea.
Fans of the animated comedy Family Guy got a shock Monday. Some wailed about it on Twitter and Facebook. Spoiler alert: The episode was about the death of Brian, the family dog. One fan started a petition to insist that Fox bring back Brian. It reached 30,000 signatures in less than 24 hours. But the internet has made petitions so easy, they may have lost their power.
NPR has obtained the findings of a CBS internal investigation of an inaccurate 60 Minutes report by Laura Logan. The report claimed an eye witness source on the Benghazi embassy attack who turned out to be a fraud.
World powers are scrambling to get a hold of a crisis in Central African Republic that U.N. officials have warned could lead to genocide. The nation slipped into bloody anarchy after rebels ousted the president in March.

Drummer Chico Hamilton, West Coast Jazz Pioneer, Dies

A linchpin of "cool" jazz in the 1950s and '60s, he assembled bands that came to be described as chamber jazz, full of unusual textures and future star talent. Hamilton, who continued performing into his ninth decade, was 92.
An investigation by The Hollywood Reporter alleges that the American Humane Association has tried to cover up instances of animal abuse and deaths on Hollywood sets. Melissa Block talks with Gary Baum, a senior writer for the magazine who reported the story.
A Massachusetts woman is getting a lot of attention in the Arab world where she's advanced to the final of Arabs Got Talent. Jennifer Grout can't speak Arabic, but she sings flawlessly in Arabic.
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