All Things Considered for Tuesday, April 15, 2014

One year has passed since bombs rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The city honored victims of the tragedy Tuesday with a tribute, including speeches from three of the victims themselves.
At last year's Boston Marathon, Carol Downing was just half a mile from the finish line when bombs exploded and injured two of her daughters. This year, she's returning to complete the race.
Each April, the shad come back to the Delaware River to spawn, and thousands of anglers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania eagerly await them. Celebrating their annual return is a local spring tradition.
Some investors avoid paying taxes in a move called round-tripping — shifting money offshore, then investing it in U.S. stocks or bonds. A study estimates it costs the U.S. billions in lost revenues.
Buy a cup of coffee, and the vendor enters your receipt in a national lottery. The prize? A new Audi each week. It's a way struggling Portugal hopes to battle the black market and boost tax revenue.

Risks Of Popular Anxiety Drugs Often Overshadowed

Benzodiazepines like Xanax and Valium are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the U.S. Patients and addicts often mix them with prescription painkillers — sometimes to deadly effect.
Some of the dangers of overdose associated with mixing benzos and opioids arise from primary care doctors actually prescribing the mix. Sean Mackey, the director of the Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab at Stanford, explains more.
The federal government just listed the lesser prairie chicken as a threatened species, but states are pushing back hard, saying that restrictions could negatively impact a number of industries.
For the past decade Pakistan has faced war, political instability and the rise of religious extremism. But those crises have fueled a new generation of Pakistani writers and artists.
Ukraine's army began a "special operation" in the east of the country Tuesday, moving against pro-Russian militants who are occupying government offices across the region.
Amid controversy over the Heartbleed security bug, the White House clarified how U.S. intelligence agencies must handle such bugs. Bloomberg Businessweek cybersecurity reporter Michael Riley explains.
After spending eight months on a Japanese space expedition, a cherry pit that's now four years old has mysteriously blossomed six years before it was due.
In Alabama, Stephen Black is trying to get college graduates to stay in the state and make life better for Alabamans. His inspiration is his grandfather, the late Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black.
Even as Boston pays tribute to the victims of the marathon bombing, runners are preparing to run in the race next week. NPR is following the stories of eight of these participants, dubbed the "NPR 8."
Nine months after the deadly crash of a runaway oil train just over the U.S. border in Canada, U.S. regulators still haven't enacted new safety standards for tank cars known for their thin shells.
Local and federal authorities worry over a rise in North Dakota's drug trade. Sharon Cohen of the Associated Press explains the proposed solutions to the issue, which some tie to the recent oil boom.
Obamacare set national rules for appealing a denied health claim — a process that used to vary by employer and state. Consumers should appeal more often, advocates say. Half the time, they'll win.
Dan Wilson is your favorite songwriter's favorite co-writer, lending a pen to artists from Nas to Adele. But he also writes music for himself — and he joins the program to talk more about it.
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