All Things Considered for Monday, April 21, 2014

The killing of three people at a checkpoint in the eastern Ukrainian city of Slaviansk has increased tension in the town, where a government building is being occupied by pro-Moscow militants.
Ukrainian hospitals have been overwhelmed since the start of violent clashes between protesters and police. Emma Jacobs of WHYY reports on the international relief effort organized out of Pennsylvania by one Ukrainian-American doctor, and on one of the patients who has received her care.
Beyond baseball's numerous explicit rules, there are plenty of unwritten rules of etiquette, as well — one of which Carlos Gomez apparently violated recently. Jonah Keri of Grantland explains.
Rod Sullivan, director of graduate programs in logistics and transportation at the Florida Coastal School of Law, explains the law and tradition of the maxim that a captain must go down with his ship.
Several bio-tech companies are developing exoskeletons that give people superhuman abilities. But these robotic suits are also doing something simpler: They're helping paralyzed veterans walk again.

Tennessee Bill Could Send Addicted Moms To Jail

The proposal awaiting the governor's signature has bipartisan support, despite doctors' opposition. Critics say it could deter expectant mothers from seeking help, or even encourage more abortions.
In Colorado, where recreational pot is now legal, stores are working hard to stand out — marketing to fans of organic, locally grown produce and trying to liken using pot to enjoying a glass of wine.
Since Florida banned gill nets 20 years ago, University of Florida researchers have helped Cedar Key replace commercial fishing with aquaculture. The area's now among the most productive clam farming regions in the U.S.
Silicon Valley is abuzz over a class-action lawsuit that accuses some of the world's most powerful technology companies of conspiring to suppress the wages of their employees. The suit alleges that Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe agreed not to recruit one another's employees. Documents from the case show top executives at the company quarreling over each other's hiring practices and patching up disputes. The case may be settled before it comes to trial next month.
The controversial, Peabody Award-winning Cartoon Network series returns Monday for a fourth season, but without creator Aaron McGruder. Fans wonder if the show will recapture its original sting.
The Boston Marathon is back, over one year since bombs rocked its finish line. NPR's Jeff Brady discusses the race, its heightened security and Meb Keflezighi, the first American to win it since 1983.
Demi Clark, who has been profiled in NPR's series Running Toward Boylston, just finished the 2014 Boston Marathon. She discusses what it was like to tackle the marathon again after the 2013 bombing.
Radical rebel groups in Syria and Iraq have gained the upper hand over moderates with Mafia-style protection rackets that force ordinary Iraqis to hand over millions across the border.
Growing numbers of Chinese have hired American surrogates, allowing a couple to get around China's ban on the procedure and its birth limits. It also guarantees a coveted U.S. passport.

Searching The Planet To Find Power For The Cloud

The quest for cheap, reliable electricity to power enormous cloud computing facilities is sending tech companies to the ends of the earth.

A Consumer's Guide To Cloud Storage

Jill Duffy, a software analyst at PCMag.com and author of Get Organized: How to Clean Up Your Messy Digital Life, explains the best ways to store information on the cloud.
Reno, Nev., is having an identity crisis. As its stream of visitors has dried up, the city has gained the reputation of a seedy gambling town without the glamour of Las Vegas. While Reno's starting to lure tech companies from the Bay Area, Will Stone of Reno Public Radio reports that changing its image remains a tough sell.
The FBI is saying that a 16-year-old boy is lucky to be alive after he hid in the wheel well of a flight from San Jose to Maui. Severe temperatures and low oxygen would make survival difficult. Investigators are examining the case.
The skirmish continues between Sriracha and Irwindale, Calif. Irwindale's city council declared that owner David Tran must curb his hot sauce factory's smelly fumes or they'll do it themselves. Tran is considering relocating, and he has already received several offers.
The Ballad of a Small Player is set in the murky underworld of Macau's casinos. Reviewer Tash Aw calls the novel a masterful and thrilling collision of old Asia and 21st century glamour.
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