All Things Considered for Thursday, April 24, 2014

Syria will likely meet an upcoming deadline to hand over its declared chemical weapons. But the agreement seems to have emboldened the Syrian regime to use other brutal tactics, including a chemical not covered by the deal.
As diplomatic talks in Geneva have failed to resolve the three-year-old civil war in Syria, the U.S. is undertaking a new covert program to send weapons in support of rebel forces there.
The Israeli government suspended peace talks with Palestinians, citing a unity agreement announced Wednesday by Palestinian leadership. The Israeli security cabinet came to the decision unanimously, angered by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas's decision to end a seven-year schism with the Hamas movement.
Enrolling in health insurance often doesn't make good economic sense for healthy young people, as they can end up paying a lot for very little coverage. Why are young invincibles still willing to pay?
Early Thursday morning, the Ukrainian military moved into towns held by militants. Firefights and casualties have been reported at a number of different locations.

Recall Woes Push Along GM's Cultural Reinvention

Critics have blamed General Motors' delayed recall of a defective ignition switch on its dysfunctional culture. But there is already a shift underway to prioritize customers and communication.
The Federal Communications Commission's proposal would let Web companies pay for faster access. But entrepreneurs, like Reddit's co-founder, are wondering how they would have fared with such rules.

What Do Net Neutrality Rules Mean For Web Users?

Tim Wu, a law professor at Columbia University, coined the phrase "net neutrality." He discusses how the Federal Communications Commission's proposed changes could affect the average consumer.
Google, Intel and others say they will now financially support the open-source software that encrypts much of the traffic on the Internet. The effort follows the discovery of a key security flaw.
A Senate panel released a report Thursday that criticizes the inspector general of the Department of Homeland Security. It accuses him of repeatedly compromising his independence.
The office has long been seen as a symbol of boredom: It's a killer of spirits, a destroyer of spontaneity. But reviewer Rosecrans Baldwin says a new book brings out its entertaining side.
With intricately composed photographs, designer Dinah Fried puts readers at the table for 50 of her favorite literary spreads. Her new book is called Fictitious Dishes.
The Food and Drug Administration is proposing to expand its regulatory powers to e-cigarettes and other popular products containing nicotine.
Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, explains the new research on e-cigarettes and offers his take on new regulations proposed by the Food and Drug Administration.

On The Ballot In Georgia This Year: JFK

JFK is running for a Georgia state Senate seat this year — John Flanders Kennedy, that is. He's a Republican, but his signs bear an uncanny similarity to the logo the former president once used.
Hospitals in out-of-the-way places are making trade-offs as they adopt electronic medical records. Some are joining larger health systems, while others are searching for ways to go it alone.
Ryan Beitz has a goal: Collect every VHS copy of the movie Speed known to man. He has over 500 of them now, he says. But the man pushes on, scouring the earth for more.
Major changes are expected for the NCAA, whose board meets Thursday. Directors will consider giving the five power conferences more autonomy, as well as changing the way scholarships are administered.
Turkey has been roiled by street protests, a Twitter ban controversy and, most recently, a growing rivalry between the ruling party's top two figures, the president and prime minister.
U.S. Postal Service workers picketed in front of Staples stores on Thursday. They were protesting USPS plans to provide mail services inside Staples stores, using nonunion Staples employees.
Steven Petrow is behind the new LGBT/straight etiquette column for The Washington Post called "Civilities." He says many letter writers are just well-meaning people afraid of doing the wrong thing.
Find an archived Episode: