All Things Considered for Monday, April 28, 2014

A pro-Ukrainian demonstration turned violent as hundreds of Ukrainians in the eastern city of Donetsk marched in support of keeping their country whole. They were opposed by pro-Russian protesters. Stun grenades were thrown into the crowd, and at least one person was wounded.
In response to events in Ukraine, the Treasury Department added sanctions on seven Russian officials and 17 companies. The Obama administration has refrained from targeting whole sectors of the Russian economy and is going out of its way to proceed as part of a coalition in part to avoid an 20th century Cold War stand off.
David J. Kramer, the president of Freedom House, talks about two of the Russian oligarchs who have been targeted for sanctions by the Obama administration.

Tornados Ravage Midwest, Leaving Over A Dozen Dead

One of the first tornados of the year wreaked havoc in the northern suburbs of Little Rock, Ark. As Michael Hibblen of Little Rock's KUAR reports, more than a dozen people have died.

Feminine, Foreign, And Struggling To Come Of Age

For unsettling weekend viewing, critic Bob Mondello recommends Argentine thriller The German Doctor and France's Young and Beautiful, which he calls "this week's most alarming foreign-language films."
Venture capitalists don't tend to pledge $20 at a time to a scrappy little startup. They look for big investments with big returns. But some are turning to Kickstarter for that next big idea.
Keith Cowing discusses his campaign to save an old '70s NASA spacecraft from becoming space junk. Cowing and his colleagues are turning to crowdfunding to wake up ISEE-3/ICE and put it to good use.

If We'd Only Known About The Impending Spam

Twenty years ago, NPR alerted staff members that they would soon have access to a new form of communication: "A collection of computer networks that is connected around the world."
In a message from its state news agency, North Korea called South Korea's president a "crafty prostitute" to her "pimp," President Obama. The verbal assault followed Obama's trip to South Korea.
An Egyptian judge sentenced hundreds of people to death Monday, including the supreme leader of the Muslim Brotherhood. It is the judge's second mass-sentencing in recent weeks.

Album Review: 'Ya Nass'

Lebanese singer Yasmine Hamdan redefines the concept of Middle Eastern music. Her debut album, Ya Nass, seamlessly fuses her roots in punk rock and techno with traditional Arabic sounds. Reviewer Banning Eyre says she is one of the most free-thinking and inventive artists singing in Arabic today.
Controversy is swirling around racist comments allegedly made by Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling. The NBA is exploring its potential responses as it investigates the allegations.
Keyon Dooling, a former Los Angeles Clipper and founder of the Respect Foundation, discusses his time playing for the team under owner Donald Sterling.
Scientists have begun using radar to search for the body of Spain's most famous writer, Miguel de Cervantes, who is believed to be buried in a medieval convent in Madrid.

Obama Bolsters Philippines, With One Eye On China

President Obama is in the Philippines on the last leg of a trip through Asia. The U.S. and the Philippines just signed an agreement to allow more American troops to rotate through the archipelago.
In the first national election since U.S. troops withdrew in 2011, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is the frontrunner for a third term in office. Despite criticism for mistreating the opposition and minority Sunnis, many say he's the man needed for Iraq's brutal situation.
In 2006, the Supreme Court said public employees have no First Amendment protection for speech "pursuant to their job duties." But Monday, in a case about criminal testimony, justices seemed dubious.
California's extreme drought has drawn battle lines over who gets water and who doesn't. As KQED's Lauren Sommer reports, fracking and farming are vying for freshwater in California's Central Valley.

New York Rep. Michael Grimm Indicted On 20 Counts

Rep. Michael Grimm of New York turned himself in to face federal charges related to a health food restaurant he ran before he was elected to Congress. The Republican congressman says he's innocent and plans to run for re-election this fall, but Democrats have have high hopes of flipping the last GOP-held seat in New York City.
Amanda Sudano and Abner Ramirez met in Nashville, started writing songs together and fell in love — maybe in that order. Their band Johnnyswim is about to release its first full album, Diamonds.
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