All Things Considered for Thursday, May 1, 2014

The Pentagon issued a study on sexual assault in the military, reports of which have jumped 50 percent in the past year. Defense Secretary Hagel says this is a positive sign of trust in the system.
Addressing the collapse of Middle East peace talks for the first time, Secretary of State John Kerry called for pause and reassessment. Meanwhile, he's under fire for comparing Israel's treatment of Palestinians to Apartheid.

For Red Deer, Iron Curtain Habits Die Hard

Two decades after a Cold War-era fence came down, red deer in the Czech Republic remain reluctant to cross into Germany — a fact suggesting that some deer are capable of teaching certain behaviors.
Ford Motor Company will soon have a new CEO: Mark Fields, who's currently the chief operating officer. Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports that Ford hopes this will quell doubts among investors.
Wary of the messages people are hearing in mosques, the Egyptian government is telling tens of thousands of preachers what they should be saying in their sermons. One preacher is defying the order.
Secretary of State John Kerry is in Ethiopia on the first leg of a visit to Africa. He hinted at possible ways to end the conflict in South Sudan, saying that "terms and a timeline" for military intervention had been decided.
Activists and parents demonstrated in the Nigerian capital, hoping to force the government to do more to rescue nearly 200 abducted teen girls, who have been missing for over two weeks. There is still little reliable information about the situation.
The White House is cracking down on colleges to improve how they handle sexual assault complaints. But critics say schools are in over their heads, and that these cases are meant for the courts.
A fight over patents is unfolding between Apple and Samsung in a California courtroom. But a case before the Supreme Court could change the concept of intellectual property in information technology.

Album Review: 'Supernova'

Ray LaMontagne's last album earned him a Grammy, but his follow-up, Supernova, turns away from his usual folk and toward '60s-tinged rock. Reviewer Meredith Ochs found the change a pleasant surprise.
The self-proclaimed governor of the eastern Ukrainian city of Luhansk announced that preparations were underway for an independence referendum. Separatists' intentions there appear to be unclear, and their opponents feel angry and abandoned by the government in Kiev.
Ambassador Alexander Vershbow, the deputy secretary-general of NATO, offers the latest on the alliance's reaction to events in Ukraine.
The Florida panhandle and the coast of Alabama have been deluged by rain this week. Some local officials say it's the worst flooding in decades. Sandra Averhart of Pensacola's WUWF sent this postcard.
Researchers have stumbled upon a virus that makes crickets horny before it kills them. Inducing your host to mate more is a great way for a virus to spread its own genes.
An uneasy fact emerges from the two dozen mass shootings in this country over the past decade: The majority of those pulling the trigger have been severely mentally ill and not receiving treatment.
Scientists were able to make immature sperm cells. If they can make the sperm viable, researchers could help men who thought they'd never have kids. But the findings also raise ethical questions.
The National Front party traditionally rallies in support of its anti-immigrant, nationalist ideals on May 1, International Workers Day. The far right is growing stronger throughout much of Europe.
Australian writer Ben Neutze, of The Daily Review, explains the differences between the original, Australian version of the TV show Rake and the version brought unsuccessfully to the U.S.
Al Feldstein, the former editor of Mad magazine, died Wednesday at the age of 88. He ran the magazine with William Gaines at the peak of its popularity.
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