All Things Considered for Friday, May 2, 2014

President Obama met with German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the White House Friday, in an effort to present a united front on the Ukrainian crisis. The pair held a joint press conference discussing the prospect of further sanctions on Russia.

Week In Politics: Ukraine And Donald Sterling

Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the Ukraine crisis and Donald Sterling's comments on race.
Sotheby's will be auctioning what it claims to be the only known surviving draft of the final lyrics for Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone," as part of the auction house's rock and pop music sale.
Facebook has introduced a way for users to log into apps anonymously as a way to build trust and protect privacy. User info would be protected from app developers, but visible to Facebook.
The saga of Donald Sterling is looming large over the opening weeks of the NBA playoffs. Even as the league moves to strip Sterling's ownership, Clippers players still have games to win on the court.
Details of the botched execution of Oklahoma inmate Clayton Lockett reveal a procedure rife with problems. A timeline released by the state's Department of Corrections offers unsettling insight into the day of Lockett's death.

The Grim History Of The Modern Death Penalty

Richard Dieter, the executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, offers a primer on the history of capital punishment.
While on a one-day visit to South Sudan's capital, Secretary of State John Kerry said the country's recent conflict could devolve into genocide. He and regional leaders voiced support for a U.N.-sanctioned force to keep civilians safe.
Toasting the Kentucky Derby with a shot of prized Pappy Van Winkle bourbon will cost you. Last fall, 222 bottles were stolen straight from the distillery, and the police still don't know who did it.
Bob Mondello reviews Belle, based on a true story about a child of an admiral and a Caribbean slave, raised as an aristocrat in 18th century England.
The April jobs report shows a labor market on the mend. Employers added 288,000 jobs, and the unemployment rate fell to 6.3 percent, partly because of a decline in the size of the labor force.
The labor market has recovered strongly in Minnesota, where the unemployment rate is just 4.8 percent.
The Ukrainian government says it has begun an operation to retake the eastern Ukrainian town of Slovyansk from pro-Moscow militants. Militants there have already shot down two government helicopters.
Moscow has accused the U.S. and EU of destroying hopes for peace in eastern Ukraine by supporting the interim government's attempts to retake towns occupied by pro-Russia militants.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the first case of Middle Eastern Respiratory Virus, or MERS, has been confirmed in the U.S. A health care worker in Indiana who recently returned from Saudi Arabia has been hospitalized and is critical condition.
Big-screen connoisseurs argue that retrofitted multiplex theaters don't provide the same immersive experience as the original, six-story screens.
A deal is in the works to draw the long battle at Homs to a close. The deal would let the rebel fighters evacuate their stronghold in the Syrian city, at which point the Syrian government would enter.
You can trace 4,000 years of economic growth through the history of light. The ways we got from a candle, made from of animal fat, to the LED lights we have today tell a lot about our modern economy.
It's stink bug season. Robbie Harris of WVTF offers a new trap for these odorous pests: a low-tech solution thought up by Virginia Tech scientists, which can be made for just a couple of bucks.
The Scottish trio makes music unbound to any one genre, with songs reflecting very different backgrounds. The group discusses friendship, influence and what it takes to make the cool kids dance.
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