All Things Considered for Monday, May 5, 2014

Unmanned aircraft offer spectacular bird's-eye views, and news organizations are eager to deploy them to get that perspective. But U.S. regulators currently prohibit drone use for commercial purposes.
The Federal Aviation Administration is under pressure to come up with rules for the commercial use of drones. The central issue: How can they fly safely in the same airspace as other aircraft?
A data scientist pitted rappers against Shakespeare to see who had the more extensive vocabulary. But he says he isn't trying to make some sweeping statement about the lyrical prowess of hip-hop.
Nigerian Islamist terrorist group Boko Haram claimed credit for abducting more than 200 schoolgirls. The girls remain missing, and parents are pressing the government to find and bring them home.
For more on the effort to rescue the abducted Nigerian girls, Melissa Block speaks with Richard Downie, the deputy director of the Africa Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.
Recruiters for political parties say it's hard to get women to run for office. They're happy to join a campaign and raise money for others, but put themselves forward? That's a tougher proposition.
Three states go to the polls Tuesday, starting what will be an eight-week stretch of primaries in the U.S. For a look at the intra-party political landscape, NPR's Charlie Mahtesian has this overview.
The University of Chicago economist won the Nobel Prize in 1992 for broadening the horizons of economics, using economic analysis to explore social issues. Becker died Saturday at the age of 83.
Target is ousting its CEO, months after a massive data breach and amid some other business issues.
Oscar-winning actress Diane Keaton's new memoir, Let's Just Say It Wasn't Pretty, tackles classic menswear, her insecurities about aging, and the new places she's learned to look for beauty.
The Supreme Court ruled 5 to 4 that the government can use Christian prayers to start town meetings, so long as legislators don't discriminate against non-Christians. It's a new chapter in the long-running fight over prayer in public places and on public occasions. NPR's Carrie Johnson explains what happened in the town of Greece, New York.
Gerry Adams, a leader of Sinn Fein, was questioned in Northern Ireland in connection with an infamous murder 42 years ago. The investigation threatens to impact the fragile peace agreement there.
The questioning of Gerry Adams arises partly from interviews conducted in academic research for Boston College. Harvard law professor Noah Feldman explains rights of disclosure in academic archives.
The paralyzing virus had seemed on the verge of disappearing. But this year cases are being reported in 10 countries. The World Health Organization has responded with strict vaccination rules.
Germany's famous Max Planck Society has opened a brain research institute in Jupiter, Fla. It's another move in the international competition to attract the best brain researchers.
Oklahoma's botched execution of Clayton Lockett is prompting other states to question their use of the drug midazolam in lethal injections. The Lockett execution is fueling new calls to re-examine how states put inmates to death.
Nasrin Sotoudeh, one of Iran's most prominent human rights lawyers, says President Hassan Rouhani has opened a space for dissident voices, but the country is still a "big prison."
A Human Rights Watch report documents brutal force used by Venezuelan security forces against peaceful demonstrators — including beatings, shootings and, in some cases, torture. The report also shows how security forces work in cahoots with pro-government armed gangs, calling the abuses the worst they have seen in years.
In her illustrated memoir Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, longtime New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast describes being an only child and conflicted caretaker to her aging parents.
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