All Things Considered for Friday, May 16, 2014

Wildfires are burning in California's San Diego County. Megan Burks of KPBS says that one person has been killed in the blaze, and high temperatures are frustrating containment efforts.
John Laird, the secretary of the California Natural Resources Agency, discusses how to fight fires differently, as well as the role climate change may play in the frequency of fires in California.

Is A Stradivarius Just A Violin?

How much of what we think of as the beautiful sound of a Stradivarius is the instrument itself — and how much is the brand?
Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the kerfuffle over Karl Rove's remarks on Hillary Clinton's health, the upcoming primaries in six states, the death of Watergate conspirator Jeb Magruder and the continuing tensions surrounding Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki.
The 24-year-old singer is poised to be the next big music export from across the Atlantic. Hear Hozier speak with NPR's Melissa Block and perform a few songs live in the studio.
Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx has announced that General Motors has entered into a consent decree with the U.S. government, a response to how the company handled its ignition switch recall. As part of the agreement, GM will pay a record penalty of $35 million.
Europeans now have the right to have search results about them deleted from online databases. But legal experts say each of the EU's 28 countries could interpret the decision differently.
After several weeks, India's parliamentary elections have finally finished. Voters swept opposition leader Narendra Modi into power as prime minister, voting for the Hindu nationalist party he leads.
Barricades in the eastern Ukrainian town of Mariupol have been dismantled, following a deal between separatist leaders, police and steelworkers from the city's biggest steel mill.
Sixty years after Brown v. Board of Education, black and white children still attend segregated schools in many parts of the country. Majority black schools are less likely to have good teachers, and kids there are more likely to be poor. That, experts say, is the single biggest obstacle to their academic success.
The World Cup in Brazil starts in less than a month, but it's the World Cup eight years from now that's grabbing headlines. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis discusses the doubts around Qatar's World Cup.
When Arizona State University graduates hear their names announced, they have Peter Lafford to thank. It's his job to ensure students' names are pronounced correctly — and it's not always easy.
The federal Medicare program for the elderly and disabled will cover two new drugs that can cure hepatitis C, a liver disease that can cause cancer and lead to death. The drugs are very expensive, but they cure hepatitis C in most cases. The government and insurers are concerned about these costs; three million Americans have hepatitis C, most of whom don't know they have it.
DNA from a 12,000-year-old skeleton of a teenage girl found in a cave in the Yucatan Peninsula shows the same markers found in modern Native Americans.
The New York Times made news this week when it announced Jill Abramson's departure. For a deeper understanding of the paper's history, author Kevin Roose recommends Hard News by Seth Mnookin.
The National Park Service says that an 89-year-old Navajo elder will be the last to live at Wupatki National Monument. Stella Peshlakai Smith's family faces eviction when she dies.
Walker's latest project is a series of sugar sculptures housed in a former sugar refinery. From far away the works look charming, but up close they tell the ugly story of the Caribbean slave trade.
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