All Things Considered for Monday, May 19, 2014

An NPR investigation has found an explosion in the use of fees charged to criminal defendants across the country, which has created a system of justice that targets the poor.
NPR's Gregory Warner talks to Robert Siegel about the mood and politics in the city of Abuja, as Nigeria struggles to deal with the schoolgirl abduction and its growing militant insurgency.
Growing up, Ivor David Balding said that he would one day own an elephant. A lifetime later, the long-time circus showman leaves behind his best, and biggest, friend: an African elephant named Flora.
The Supreme Court delivered a blow on behalf of writers, giving a screenwriter's daughter a chance to prove in court that the critically acclaimed movie Raging Bull infringed her father's copyright.
Jill Abramson's firing as editor of The New York Times has prompted conversation about biases that affect women in positions of authority. Two prominent fields of research explore this question.
Robert Siegel speaks with Cold War-era Moscow correspondent Marvin Kalb about Sukhodrev's life and work. The legendary interpreter died last week at age 81.Over three decades, Viktor Sukhodrev was the interpreter for every Soviet leader from Nikita Khrushchev to Mikhail Gorbachev.
The soccer-mad country produces some of the world's best players. They often come from shantytowns, where they learn the game playing barefoot in the streets or on dusty fields.
Thanks to a big spring crop in Veracruz and police crackdowns on drug cartels, high prices for Mexican limes are falling earthward, just in time for summer cocktails. Mexican farmers are celebrating.
The Justice Department has filed charges against five members of the Chinese military, alleging that they're hackers who committed espionage against U.S. companies.
Credit Suisse will plead guilty to criminal charges and pay over $2 billion in fines in connection to allegations of tax evasion. But the CEO and chairman are reportedly expected to keep their jobs.
AT&T's $49 billion acquisition of DirecTV now faces regulatory scrutiny. Meanwhile, a deal merging Comcast and Time Warner Cable is also in the works. Consumer advocates worry about consolidation, but many observers think the deals could hold down costs for the merged companies.

Book Review: 'Abide'

Poet Tess Taylor reviews the posthomously published poetry collection Abide, by Jake Adam York.
Among his colleagues at the CIA, Robert Ames was considered the quintessential spy. Integral in the Oslo Peace Accords, the late secret agent is now the subject of Kai Bird's book, The Good Spy.

The Blogging Battlegrounds Of Eastern Ukraine

A social media struggle is unfolding in eastern Ukraine, as bloggers on both Ukrainian and separatist sides plead their cases. But many find they face surveillance, trolls and threats as they work.
Emily Parker, author of Now I Know Who My Comrades Are, joins the program to explain how the Internet is helping to change activism.
Tea Party candidates did well in GOP primary elections in 2010 and 2012; this year, not so much. Part of this lack of success is because establishment candidates have generally out-raised them.
Abu Hamza, an Islamic cleric alleged to have started an al-Qaida camp in the U.S., has been convicted on terrorism charges in a New York courtroom.
For one day, California Chrome's hopes for a Triple Crown were in danger. In its first two races, the horse had worn a nasal strip, which wasn't permitted at Belmont Park — until Monday.
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