All Things Considered for Tuesday, May 20, 2014

In a day packed full of primaries, voters headed to the polls in six states — including three that are expected to have highly competitive Senate races.
The phony vaccination programs were used in its spy operations abroad. The decision comes after leaders from U.S. public health schools brought the practice to light.
Science writer Brian Switek responds to the recent discovery of bones that many say are from the largest dinosaur ever. Switek disputes the claim, explaining why a statement like that can't be made.
Narendra Modi made his maiden visit to the halls of India's parliament Tuesday, shortly after being unanimously voted his party's leader. Then, he was off to the presidential palace to receive the invitation to form a government.
A report of child abuse is made every 10 seconds in the U.S., and victims often find themselves feeling helpless. But some children are getting assistance from a group of unlikely heroes — on motorcycles. Gloria Hillard reports on Bikers Against Child Abuse, an organization that promises to support scared kids on their way to court.

Big Fees For The Big Easy's Poorest Defendents

In the next installment of an NPR investigation, Joseph Shapiro goes to New Orleans to look at the ways poor people are charged for their public defender in court.
U.S. officials announced they've arrested over 90 people in 19 countries for using and distributing a malware tool that makes cybercrime simple. Brian Krebs of the website Krebs on Security explains.
Thailand's army imposed martial law overnight, as the country's political crisis continues to deepen. Journalist Michael Sullivan reports on the crisis from Bangkok.
Robert Siegel speaks with Alexander Stinton, the winner of the 2014 Sophie Kerr Prize, the nation's largest undergraduate literary award. Stinton is a graduate of Washington College.
There are increasing signs of friction between pro-Moscow separatists and local residents in eastern Ukraine, as some local people demand an end to the violence and lawlessness in the region.
More than a half-century after his death, Stepan Bandera is a deeply divisive figure in the current battle. Ukrainian nationalists put up posters of him while pro-Russian separatists burn his effigy.

The Best Commencement Speech, Ever

What makes a good commencement address great? We read more than 300 speeches and singled out the qualities that made them rise to the top.
Fifty years ago today, two astronomers in New Jersey accidentally discovered the Big Bang's afterglow. The roaring space static their hilltop antenna detected came from the birth of the universe.
In 1714, the British government established a prize to solve the greatest challenge of that time: Pinpoint a ship's location at sea by knowing its longitude. Now, 300 years later, it's bringing back the Longitude Prize. This time, the public will choose the greatest challenge in a vote that begins Thursday.
National Public Radio has eliminated 28 positions and plans to end the program "Tell Me More." The moves come as the network continues its attempt to eliminate budget deficits.
Filmmaker Aaron Yeger tells the story of Roma Holocaust victims in the documentary A People Uncounted, and he joins the program to explain more.
Two Republicans with compelling personal stories, Monica Wehby and Jason Conger, are vying for the chance to unseat Oregon's incumbent Democratic senator, Jeff Merkley.
Theo Croker is a descendant of old-school New Orleans jazz royalty, but his fusion of different genres is anything but traditional.
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