All Things Considered for Wednesday, May 28, 2014

President Obama visited the U.S. Military Academy Wednesday, delivering a commencement speech to West Point cadets. He used the occasion to lay out a foreign policy vision based in pragmatism.
Robert Siegel speaks to Robert Kagan of the Brookings Institution and Michele Flournoy, the former undersecretary of defense, about President Obama's commencement speech to West Point graduates.
Steve Inskeep of NPR's Morning Edition spoke with President Obama shortly after the president's speech to West Point graduates. He offers a brief preview of that conversation.
Massachusetts is considering a bill that would require background checks on all private gun sales, including at gun shows and online, and would give police more discretion to deny gun licenses.
Police in Sioux City, Iowa, use photo enforcement to catch traffic violations. An automatic camera takes a photo of a violator's license plate, then police find the registered owner and send out a ticket. South Dakota legislators have passed a law that will not allow their state's Department of Transportation to release vehicle information for this purpose. South Dakota Public Broadcasting's Gary Ellenbolt reports that the bill was co-sponsored by a state senator who has reportedly received several of these tickets. The senator claims that with photo enforcement, there's no right for a defendant to face the accuser, as guaranteed by the Constitution.
The component of Obamacare that requires employers to provide health insurance has been delayed twice. Now, groups on both sides of the political spectrum are arguing to get rid of it altogether.
Financial problems have led many hospitals to shut down completely. Georgia is issuing licenses to rural hospitals that would allow them to become nothing more than free-standing emergency rooms.
Reading Rainbow went off the air in 2009, but the show's host, LeVar Burton, is raising money for an interactive website — and offering some pledge rewards that make NPR tote bags pale in comparison.
For a few hours Tuesday, cosmic storm chasers thought they'd detected a huge explosion in the Andromeda galaxy.
Under music director Alan Gilbert, the orchestra is taking a page from the visual arts world by launching an 11-day festival featuring both established and emerging composers.
Poet, performer and political activist Maya Angelou has died after a long illness at her home in Winston-Salem, N.C. She was 86.

Maya Angelou Reads 'Still I Rise'

Author and poet Maya Angelou died Wednesday at the age of 86. In a recording, Angelou reads her poem "Still I Rise."
In a new report released Wednesday, the inspector general for the Department of Veterans Affairs says that the department has frequently manipulated records to hide medical care delays. Investigators focused their probe on a hospital in Phoenix, Ariz.
The worm causes a debilitating intestinal disease called schistosomiasis. And the parasite is spreading rapidly because of an economic boom along the shores of East Africa's Lake Malawi.
Dr. Simon Lewis of the University of Leeds has discovered a vast peatland in a remote part of the Republic of Congo. The bog covers an area the size of England and is thought to contain billions of tons of peat. Scientists say that investigating the carbon-rich material could shed light on 10,000 years of environmental change in this little-studied region.
Google is getting into the automobile business. Since the industry is littered with failed upstarts and revolutionary ideas, NPR's Sonari Glinton asks: Why would anyone want to do that?
Business Insider reporter Aaron Taube recently took a look at the world of corporate social media, where writing a 140-character tweet can take up to 45 days. He explains the long and careful process.
Syrian refugees in Lebanon are already voting in an election that's seen as Bashar Assad's rigged bid for legitimacy. Many refugees believe that if they don't vote, they'll never be allowed back home.
Musicians and insiders talk to NPR about the jazz label's legacy. "It's just like the Empire State Building or the White House," says one. "It's a monument."
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