All Things Considered for Thursday, May 29, 2014

Reports from Ukraine say a general was among about a dozen soldiers killed when their helicopter was shot down by pro-Moscow separatists.
Afghanistan's presidential election in April left no candidate with more than 50 percent of the vote. A second-round election will be held on June 14 — during the peak of the Taliban fighting season. There are growing concerns that election day could be a blood bath, and that a close outcome would result in political instability.
With more than a million visitors expected for the games, Brazilian authorities are trying to control the mosquitoes that carry the disease and stop a sudden spike of cases in Sao Paulo.
Stuart Foster of South Carolina was jailed last year in Guangzhou for theft. He says he was forced to assemble Christmas lights, some of them exported to the U.S.
On Friday's Morning Edition, Republican Sen. Bob Corker addresses President Obama's foreign policy vision.
A new report from the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers is shedding light on some unexpected consequences of being convicted of a crime — everything from troubles with employment to bans in public housing. The group says it's time to start thinking about forgiveness.
President Obama nominated a controversial Georgia judge — one who once supported the display of the Confederate flag — for the federal bench. The White House says there's a particular reason for that.
As Oklahoma enters its fourth year of sustained drought, some farmers expect the harvest to be so bad they'll end up calling their insurance agents and declaring this year a total loss. StateImpact Oklahoma's Joe Wertz reports that some are calling this the worst drought since the '50s — or even since the Dust Bowl.
An ancient Greek play about the wounds of war is getting a new angle in A Female Philoctetes — a production made up of mostly Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.
Meredith Ochs reviews John Fullbright's second album, Songs.
Next week President Obama will unveil his plan for the first nationwide program to control greenhouse gas emissions from the electrical power sector. States that have already started to control such emissions say it's not as hard as they thought it would be. They've ended up exceeding their goals, largely because of abundant natural gas, which burns more cleanly than coal.
Ambassador C. Boyden Gray, former White House counsel to George H.W. Bush, assisted in the development of the cap-and-trade system. He talks to Robert Siegel about how the system evolved over time.
Last year, about 1 in 7 people in the U.S. were getting food stamps, or SNAP benefits. But the numbers have started to drop as more people find work and better-paying jobs, analysts say.
Large mammal migration in Africa has generally been hindered by the subdivision and fencing of land. But this one remains possible because it takes place in a unique, multi-country wildlife corridor.
A recent report out of Brussels says Germany's economy is prospering — and that's a big problem for the rest of the eurozone. Our Planet Money team reports on how doing extremely well can cause trouble when you're a member of a group.
The town of Jos has been the scene of widespread Muslim-Christian killings for years. One group is now working — with some apparent success — to keep the violence from spiraling out of control.
Pakistan is reeling from the latest so-called "honor killing." Just feet from a courthouse, a pregnant woman was stoned to death for marrying a man against her family's wishes.
Devices that scan your brain and read your emotions are no longer sci-fi. Researchers say the technology could threaten privacy by revealing things like your sexual orientation or political leanings.

TV Offerings Are Hotter Than Usual This Summer

This year, more original, highly anticipated summer TV series are debuting on the broadcast networks than ever before — along with some big-ticket series from cable and one of Netflix's biggest shows.

For TV Advertisers, A Hunt For Live Audiences

Advertising deals for the upcoming television season are now being negotiated. Jeanine Poggi, TV reporter for Ad Age, says that in an era of time-shifted viewing, advertisers are in hot pursuit of the people who watch TV live.
Find an archived Episode: