All Things Considered for Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Time Warner has rejected a buyout offer, reportedly as high as $80 billion, from Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox. A deal between the two companies would create a media powerhouse — and a thicket of challenges for anti-trust regulators.
Americans wager nearly $60 billion a year on lotteries. Revenues help states, which use the money to provide services. But researchers say the games often draw low-income gamblers who are on welfare.
Turns out that for 7,000 years, snacking on nutsedge may have helped people avoid tooth decay. But at some point, the root it lost its charm. By the 1970s, it was branded "the world's worst weed."
The Senate has voted 53 to 44 to confirm Ronnie White for a federal court judgeship in Missouri, 17 years after he was first nominated by President Bill Clinton.
Rep. Pete Gallego of Texas represents a district that sprawls for 800 miles along the U.S.-Mexico border. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the border crisis as seen firsthand, suggesting the actions he'd like to see the White House and Congress take.
Six weeks after the Mississippi GOP Senate primary, controversy still swirls around the outcome, as defeated challenger Chris McDaniel continues to dispute the election's results.
Citing a list of grievances, some conservative advocates have been raising the possibility of impeaching President Obama. But the calls have become routine in the second term of the modern presidency.
As a basketball coach, Red Klotz had one job — to lose. As a player, coach and general manager of the Washington Generals, Klotz lost countless times to the Harlem Globetrotters. Klotz died at age 93.
By prohibiting acts like loitering and sleeping in public, cities hope to make streets safer. But advocates for the homeless say this type of legislation can be counterproductive.
Ben Watt is a singer and DJ, best known for being in the British pop duo Everything but the Girl. Now, he's back with a new album and a book that gives an inside look at his complicated relationship with his parents.
As the violence between Hamas and Israel continues, so too do the funerals that come in its wake. NPR correspondents Ari Shapiro and Emily Harris attended two such funerals today, in Tel Aviv and Gaza respectively, and they tell of what they learned there.

The Devastation On The Ground In Gaza City

Audie Cornish speaks with Robert Turner of the United Nations in Gaza City, discussing the extent of the devastation there in the midst of Israel's bombardment.
Ever try shopping on your smartphone and decide you don't want to put in your credit card number? Visa says it's a big problem and came up with a tool that combines improved security and convenience.
Companies around the country are helping parents search their kids' rooms for drugs. But civil liberties groups say they're crossing a line — and police have their own concerns.

Even Among Babies, Practice Makes Perfect

Babies as young as 7 months old are already rehearsing the motions behind speech, even though they can't talk yet. Robert Siegel speaks with the woman behind these findings — Patricia Kuhl, the co-director of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences at University of Washington.
A Houston internist who supported the Affordable Care Act now finds that many of her patients who bought less expensive coverage have trouble getting the specialized care they need.
New York banking regulators are expected to release new rules this week governing Bitcoin and other virtual currencies. As WSHU's Charles Lane reports, industry experts are both welcoming the regulations and still worried they could go too far.
Rebels captured the eastern half of Aleppo, the country's biggest city, two years ago. Now President Assad's army looks likely to drive them out in what would be a major blow to the opposition.
Twenty years ago, José Carreras, Plácido Domingo and Luciano Pavarotti gave a sold-out concert at LA's Dodger Stadium. It still echoes today in both the music business and public TV.
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