All Things Considered for Saturday, July 19, 2014

Separatist rebels at the site of the shot down Malaysia Airlines jet in Eastern Ukraine have been giving restricted access to international monitors Saturday. Corey Flintoff speaks with NPR's Kelly McEvers from Donetsk on the effort and the outcry over the slow pace of the body recovery and evidence gathering.
A number of scientists and others members of the AIDS research community died in the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine. NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with journalist and editor in chief of HIV Plus magazine Diane Anderson-Minshall about the loss.
Propaganda has always been a part of war. Social media is expanding the battlefield, but sometimes it also creates a space for mutual respect.
During the Central American civil wars of the 1970s and 1980s, U.S. aid groups were established to assist the large number of migrants. Now those same groups, like El Rescate in Los Angeles, are helping to assist the large number of unaccompanied Central American children illegally entering the U.S.
The business of pop culture conventions is exploding, with comic cons and other animation and pop culture gatherings taking place every weekend at cities around the country.
Lewis wrote her sunny new album, The Voyager, in the shadow of death and separation. "I've always just had sort of a dark take on life," she says. "Hopefully the music transcends that in a way."
Marja Mills spent more than a year living next door to reclusive author Harper Lee and her sister. She documents that time in The Mockingbird Next Door. But Lee says she never authorized the book.
There are about 100,000 native Kenyans living in America, clustered in Boston, Atlanta, Washington D.C., Dallas and parts of the West Coast. How do they stay connected? A radio station.
Triathlete Tim Bomba has spent a decade helping people feel comfortable swimming in the ocean. But before he could do that, he had to overcame his own fear of the water at the age of 52.
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