Brand & Martínez for September 17, 2012

'Downton Abbey'-inspired cookbook aims to satisfy your Crawley cravings

Downton Abbey Cookbook

F+W Media

Book cover for "The Unofficial Downton Abbey Cookbook," by Emily Ansara Gaines.

Downton Abbey Cookbook

F+W Media

Image of Crunchy Fig and Bleu Cheese Tarts from the "Unofficial Downton Abbey Cookbook."

Downton Abbey Cookbook

F+W Media

Image of Butternut Squash soup from the "Unofficial Downton Abbey Cookbook."

Downton Abbey cookbook

F+W Media

Image of the recipe for Crawley Family Chicken Breasts with Caper Cream Sauce from the "Unofficial Downton Abbey Cookbook."

Downton Abbey Cookbook

F+W Media

Mixed Berry Scones with Clotted Cream from the "Unofficial Downton Abbey Cookbook."

Downton Abbey Cookbook

F+W Media

An image of Yorkshire Pudding from the "Unofficial Downton Abbey Cookbook."

Photograph Nick Briggs. +44(0)20.

Season 3 of Downton Abbey premiered on British TV Sunday night. We'll have to wait until January to see it stateside, but a new cookbook delivers an interim fix.


Season three of the wildly popular British costume drama, 'Downton Abbey,' premiered on British television Sunday night, but those of us in the States won't be able to watch it on PBS until January.

If you're already craving a 'Downton Abbey' fix, you might want to check out a new cookbook based on the series by Emily Ansara Baines.

"I really love history and I really love this series. It's like my two passions, watching this cultural vision and cooking," Baines told Madeleine Brand. "Since I'd done the 'Unofficial Hunger Games Cookbook,' I knew I could probably do a cookbook for 'Downton Abbey,' and it would be a great excuse to eat a lot of fattening food and get away with it."

Baines brings together recipes from the posh upstairs world of the Crawleys and the more humble downstairs world of the servants in a tribute to British cuisine of the turn of the century. She says she enjoyed making recipes inspired by the food the servants eat, because the cuisine of the Crawleys is much too rich.

"It's all very decadent food, which, if you were lactose intolerant back then, you were miserable," said Baines. "If you were in the upper class you were probably eating a lot of French food at the time, because it was very in vogue to eat French."

With each recipe, Baines offers suggestions on appetizer or wine pairings, and she manages to slip in some fun historical references where appropriate.

Unofficial Downton Abbey Cookbook

Guest:

Emily Ansara Baines, author of The Unofficial Downton Abbey Cookbook, and the Unofficial Hunger Games Cookbook.


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