A three-minute rundown of the best (and worst) of this week’s film releases, including the go-to movie for the weekend.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
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FilmWeek Marquee: ‘Snatched,’ ‘King Arthur’ and ‘Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story’




British actor Charlie Hunnam poses for a photograph upon arrival at the European Premiere of
British actor Charlie Hunnam poses for a photograph upon arrival at the European Premiere of "King Arthur: legend of the Sword" in London on May 10, 2017.
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

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Larry Mantle and KPCC film critics Claudia Puig and Lael Lowenstein review this week's most memorable releases.

"Snatched" (R)

Claudia: “This was fitfully funny, but what I appreciated about it was the chemistry between Goldie Hawn and Amy Schumer. When they're focusing on the mother-daughter dynamic, that's when it's at its best.”

Lael: “Absolutely agree. The mother-daughter dynamic is the best part, would have liked to see more of these two comedians interacting with each other. The convoluted, over-the-top escapades in South America I could have taken it or left it.”

"King Arthur: Legend of the Sword" (PG-13)

Lael: “Very much a testosterone-driven, guy-movie retelling of the King Arthur legend...with Guy Ritchie's fanatic visual style and over-the-top editing. It's a little bit much, but [Charlie] Hunnam is easy on the eyes, and it's certainly very entertaining.”

Claudia: “He is easy on the eyes... It was a little too frenzied and hectic for me. The story was lost among all the warring, arrows and craziness. Not my favorite.”

"Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story" (Unrated)

Lael: “The best film of the week as far as I'm concerned. Harold and Lillian were two unsung heroes of Hollywood. He, a storyboard artist and she, a pioneering researcher. Wonderful portrait of their marriage, also of two people working in the industry, and also of an early kind of feminist.”

Claudia: “It's a film history lesson of sorts, but also celebrates hardworking people, ordinary people in a sense, unsung heroes. And it enlightens us and warms our hearts. It fires on all cylinders.”