Fresh Air

Fresh Air with Terry Gross is weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues with intimate conversations and unusual insights.

Recent Episodes

Original 'Cabaret' Emcee Joel Grey

Joel Grey explains how he brought his decadent Cabaret character to life on both the stage and screen, and reflects on coming out as gay after years of being closeted. His memoir is 'Master Of Ceremonies.' Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews 'Classic James P. Johnson Sessions (1921 - 1943).'

'Mad Max' Director George Miller

George Miller, who directed the first Mad Max film in 1979, says it will be a few years before he has any idea as to whether 'Mad Max: Fury Road' "really stuck." The film is nominated for 10 Oscars. Music historian Ed Ward remembers Dan Hicks.

Best Of: Bassem Youssef / 'Homegrown Terrorists' / Why Our 'First Bite' Matters

Known as the "Egyptian Jon Stewart," Bassem Youssef created what became the most popular TV show in Egypt's history, but the government had the show cancelled, and Youssef fled. Then, CNN's Peter Bergen describes how the Internet and social media have been used to radicalize and recruit Americans to jihad. Finally, Bee Wilson says that our taste preferences can be formed even before birth. Her new book is 'First Bite.'

How We Learn To Eat

Bee Wilson says that our taste preferences can be formed even before birth. Her new book, 'First Bite,' examines how genetics, culture, memory and early feeding patterns contribute to a child's palate. Also, David Edelstein reviews the Coen brothers' new epic, 'Hail, Caesar!'

Political Satirist Bassem Youssef

Known as the "Egyptian Jon Stewart," Bassem Youssef created what became the most popular TV show in Egypt's history — but the government had the show cancelled, and Youssef fled. He talks about leaving a career in medicine for comedy, being detained and life after the Arab Spring. Also, Milo Miles reviews 'Big Grrrl Small World' from alt-rapper Lizzo.

Who Are America's 'Homegrown Terrorists'?

CNN's Peter Bergen describes how the Internet and social media have been used to radicalize and recruit Americans to jihad — and how some new jihadists then use those same tools to draw in others. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'The Yid.'