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Senate repeals Don't Ask, Don't Tell: gays may now serve openly in the military




Activists hold signs as they shout slogans during a rally on 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 10, 2010. Servicemembers Legal Defense Network held the rally to call on the Senate to pass the National Defense Authorization Bill that includes the repeal of 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' which prohibits gay people from serving openly in the military. The House voted 250 to 175 on Dec. 15 2010 to repeal the DADT policy.
Activists hold signs as they shout slogans during a rally on 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 10, 2010. Servicemembers Legal Defense Network held the rally to call on the Senate to pass the National Defense Authorization Bill that includes the repeal of 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' which prohibits gay people from serving openly in the military. The House voted 250 to 175 on Dec. 15 2010 to repeal the DADT policy.
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The Senate repealed DADT on Saturday, raising new questions about how and when the new legislation will be implemented. Should military personnel come out to their colleagues, or is the water still too hot? And what's the next step for the gay rights movement? Robert Bradley Sears, director of UCLA's Institute on Sexual Orientation Law and Public Policy joins us.