The Madeleine Brand Show for April 19, 2012

Could the News Corp scandal come to the US?

Rebekah Brooks Resigns As Chief Executive Of News International

Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch (C) looks down as he leaves the One Aldwych Hotel surrounded by his personal security team to speak with reporters after meeting with the family of murdered school girl Milly Dowler on in London, England.

The phone-hacking scandal that has rocked the News Corp. media empire could be coming to America. It started in Great Britain, where Rupert Murdoch's News of the World tabloid was brought down by accusations of phone hacking and police bribery.

Several of central figures in the scandal have been forced to resign, like Rupert Murdoch's son James Murdoch, and News Corp has paid out millions of pounds in settlements to victims of phone hacking.

The controversy has since engulfed several other newspapers, the London Metropolitan Police, Scotland Yard, and even British Prime Minister David Cameron.

Now Mark Lewis, the British lawyer who represented nearly 100 of those alleged phone hacking victims, is in the U.S.

When Lewis was first involved in this case, he was a lawyer in Manchester specializing in defamation cases. He took on the case of Gordon Taylor, who runs the Professional Footballers Assoc. in Britain, and sued News Corp. newspaper The News of the World to prevent them from printing a story that alleged he was having an affair.

Guest:

Mark Lewis, the British attorney who represents victims of alleged phone-hacking from News Corp.


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