The Madeleine Brand Show for May 30, 2012

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange faces extradition, where will WikiLeaks go from here?

Julian Assange Takes His Extradition Case To The Supreme Court

Oli Scarff/Getty Images

Julian Assange (C), the founder of the WikiLeaks whistle-blowing website, leaves the Supreme Court on in London, England. Assange lost the battle over his final UK appeal against his extradition to Sweden, where he is sought for questioning over alleged sex crimes.

The high court in Britain ruled today that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange can be extradited to Sweden to face charges of rape and sexual molestation. Assange has been fighting extradition for almost two years. And he may continue his legal battle.

The court gave him two weeks to challenge its ruling, and Assange's lawyers may also appeal to the European Court of Human Rights. All this legal wrangling has taken a toll on WikiLeaks. The website, which became notorious for leaking all manner of government and corporate documents, has been struggling to survive.

Banks, especially the Bank of America, have refused to process credit card donations to the site. Online visitors to WikiLeaks will find a site where pages don't load and the most recent documents date back to February.

Assange started WikiLeaks in 2006. Within a few years, WikiLeaks was publishing huge troves of secret documents, sometimes working with major newspapers like The New York Times and the Guardian.

Xeni Jardin, editor at BoingBoing.net, joins the show to discuss the past and future of WikiLeaks and Assange.

Guest:

Xeni Jardin, editor at BoingBoing.net


blog comments powered by Disqus