The Madeleine Brand Show for June 6, 2012

Author Ray Bradbury leaves a literary legacy in his wake

The 12th Annual L.A. Times Festival Of Books - Day 1

Charley Gallay/Getty Images

Writer Ray Bradbury delivers a lecture at the 12th Annual L.A. Times Festival of Books at Royce Hall on the U.C.L.A. campus on April 28, 2007 in Los Angeles, California.

Sci-Fi author Ray Bradbury has died. The author of "Fahrenheit 451," "The Martian Chronicles" and "Dandelion Wine" passed away at the age of 91.

Bradbury began his career working as a pulp-fiction writer. "First year, I made $15, second $45, $200, so I was poor for a long time." His short stories eventually found mainstream publishers.

"Fahrenheit 451", a novel about a futuristic, high-tech, book-burning society, secured his place in literary history. His early work in the 1950's captured Cold War anxiety and uncertainty about the future.

Bradbury considered "Fahrenheit 451" his only true science-fiction novel, who said his other works should be classified as fantasy. "It was a book based on real facts and also on my hatred for people who burn books," he told The Associated Press in 2002.

Bradbury ranged from horror and mystery to humor and sympathetic stories about blacks and Mexican-Americans. Bradbury also ventured off of book pages onto screens, scripting the 1956 film version of "Moby Dick," contributing to "The Twilight Zone" and adapting dozens of his works for "The Ray Bradbury Theater."

Bradbury continued writing through his 90s, writing from the basement office of his home in the Cheviot Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles and appeared from time to time at bookstores, public library fundraisers and other literary events around Los Angeles.

Guest:

David Kipen is a book critic and founder of Libros Schmibros, a lending library and used bookstore in Boyle Heights close to the Metro Gold Line stop.

Information from The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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