The Madeleine Brand Show for July 23, 2012

NCAA hits Penn State football hard with fine and sanctions

NCAA Announces Corrective and Punitive Measures for Penn State

Joe Robbins/Getty Images

NCAA president Mark Emmert (R) speaks as Ed Ray, chairman of the NCAA's executive committee and Oregon State president looks on, during a press conference at the NCAA's headquarters to announce sanctions against Penn State University's football program in Indianapolis, Indiana. The sanctions are a result of a report that the university concealed allegations of child sexual abuse made against former defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky, who was found guilty on 45 of 48 counts related to sexual abuse of boys over a 15-year period.

The NCAA hit Penn State's football program with a $60 million fine and multi-year sanctions. Penn State will be banned from all post-season play for four years. The number of scholarships it can award will be cut. And every victory the team chalked up since 1998 will be erased.

The NCAA's sanctions following the worst scandal in the history of college football stopped short of delivering the "death penalty" - shutting down the sport completely. But, current or incoming football players are free to immediately transfer and compete at another school.

"Against this backdrop, Penn State accepts the penalties and corrective actions announced today by the NCAA," Penn State President Rodney Erickson said in a statement. "With today's announcement and the action it requires of us, the University takes a significant step forward."

While these are among the toughest penalties the NCCA has ever handed down, some say they didn't go far enough.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Guest:

Mike Pesca, correspondent for NPR.


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