Marketplace Morning Report

Start your day with an up-to-the-minute report on the world of business and finance with host David Brancaccio.

Recent Episodes

10-13-2014 Morning Report - Ireland may close tax loophole

It's advantageous for companies to do business in Ireland because of how that country calculates taxes. Tech giants like Google, Facebook and Apple have set up subsidiaries there, and in doing so, have saved billions of dollars thanks to a tax rate that's way lower than the rates in many other countries. Well, the Irish government is expected to unveil a new budget tomorrow, and there are reports it'll include a proposal to close that tax loophole. Plus, financial innovation in the housing market is back. We're hearing terms like "R-E-O-to-rental securitization, or "rental backed-securities." If you're having flashbacks to the a sub-prime crisis, you're not alone. But many are saying this is a different animal.

10-10-2014 Morning Report - Electronics and earth metals

The sell-a-thon persists on world stock markets this morning. This is the week that the International Monetary Fund revised downward its forecast for economic growth around the world, not so much the U.S., but a lot of other places, including Asia and Europe. More on that. Plus, we talk about a connection between the digital device that so many of us can't seem to do without and digging big holes in the ground--Electronics need certain rare metals and other natural materials that are often in limited supply and hard to find.
 
 
 

10-09-2014 Morning Report - Saving for retirement

At five major U.S. airports, the government will screen passengers for Ebola symptoms. In Spain, three more people have been quarantined, and in Texas, Thomas Eric Duncan succumbed to the disease yesterday. As the death toll from the Ebola epidemic approaches 4,000, the World Bank is out with a new report on the economic effects of the virus's spread, estimating the cost could be $32 billion. Meanwhile, a new report reveals that senior citizens in 49 out of 50 states don't have enough money to replace their pre-retirement income. Experts say retirees need at least 70 percent of the income they earned in their working years, but only seniors in Washington, D.C. and Nevada are in a position to make this happen. Also, many consumers don't know that bills are negotiable. Sometimes, all you have to do is pick up the phone and call your cable or cell phone provider and you could save as much as 10 percent from your monthly bill.

 

 

10-08-2014 Morning Report - Whip it (inflation)

Worries about the economies of Europe, Japan, and China helped shove the Dow Jones Industrial Average down 272 points, yesterday, 1.6 percent. The S&P 500 fell 1.5 percent. But a counter-vailing push could come later today as companies start to release their quarterly profits and losses. Monsanto's results come during the trading day. Alcoa's after the market closes. Stock prices have been held up in part by the trend of using profits to buy back company shares. But are companies taking this too far? And forty years ago tonight, October 8th, 1974, President Gerald Ford went before congress and declared a kind of war: the Whip Inflation Now speech. We take a stroll down inflation memory lane. Plus, Fortune Magazine's senior editor at large Alan Sloan, has been reflecting on this autumn's big Moment (capital M) for bond investors. He joins us to discuss.

10-07-2014 - Morning Report - Disease detectives

First up, we get a new window on jobs in America—one the Federal Reserve watches closely to measure the strength of the overall labor market. It's called JOLTS, or "Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey." We have more on what a certain number in that report—the Quits Rate—says about the U.S. economy. And it's turning out to be a bleak autumn for factories in one pivotal global economy: Germany's. More on that. Plus, public health officials continue to track the well being of about 50 patients in Dallas who may have been exposed to the Ebola virus. To date there are no signs of infection. The labor-intensive surveillance operation is being run by local health officials and a pair of epidemiologists for the CDC. The two are officers in the CDC's Epidemic Intelligence Service. With the Ebola outbreak growing, these 'disease detectives' are taking on an increasingly important role. On todays show, a profile of people who fly into communicable disease hotspots for a living.

10-06-2014 - Morning Report - Talking with the president of the NY Fed

First up, William Dudley, president of the New York Fed, responds to criticism his team needs to be tougher on Wall Street firms. This question moved to the foreground after the public radio program This American Life--with news organization ProPublica--obtained audio recordings made secretly inside the New York Fed. The recordings were made by a then-New York Fed employee who would later sue for wrongful dismissal. Next, to Brazil, where the incumbent president Dilma Rousseff now faces a tough run-off election, after a more pro-business candidate did much better than expected in voting yesterday. The candidacy of the centrist had been practically written off at one stage in the campaign with attention focused on a third, upstart candidate, who fizzled. The Brazilian economy has weakened under the incumbent, as capital moved away from emerging markets, like Brazil. Some middle class Brazilians took to the streets in the past year to protest poor government services.