Marketplace

Every weekday on Marketplace, Kai Ryssdal hosts a lively and unexpected exploration of the day’s business and economic news from Wall Street to your wallet.

Recent Episodes

04-09-2014- Marketplace- Sachs, fonts, and tech

Goldman Sachs considers shutting down its private trading exchange as publicity about high-speed trading and talk of SEC investigations draw attention to the bank. The bank will consider how it profits/benefits from the private exchange versus the cost of scrutiny and negative attention. Are the calculations similar to those in its decision to sell its commodities trading business? Also, the break-up of a graphic design duo has resulted in a lawsuit of $20 million – over fonts. Tobias Frere-Jones and Jonathan Hoefler worked together for 15 years to create some of the most famous and ubiquitous fonts around– used by GQ, Martha Stewart, the New York Jets, and Saturday Night Live. They won awards for their typefaces - before the relationship turned sour. Who knew there was so much money in fonts? Plus: Not to worry, Comcast tells Congress. It needs to merge with Time Warner Cable, so it will have the strength to compete with the real heavyweights in broadband and content delivery – companies like Google and Apple. We examine the argument.

04-08-2014- Marketplace- Jolts and lawsuits

The "Job Opening and Labor Turnover" survey out today says employers advertised 4.2m jobs in Ferburaury, the highest figure since January 2008. It also showed that more people are quitting their jobs. We investigate what kind of jobs are being posted and the workers leaving their jobs. Plus: Employees of some of the biggest tech firms, incliding Apple and Google, have accused their employers of colluding to prevent workers from being hired by their rivals and are asking for $9 billion as part of a class-action law suit. The ecidence against the companies is pretty damning. So what impact is this lawsuit going to have on wages in the industry and what does this say about the complexities of hiring and keeping tech firms? Also, the Manischewitz Co. is changing hands again, this time acquired by a private-equity group that plans to push Manischewitz’s efforts to broaden its customer base to non-Jews by latching on to the healthy food movement. What could be healthier than kosher?

 

04-07-2014- Marketplace- Amazon Fresh

Tomorrow Obama signs an EO meant to help close the wage gap for federal contractors. Of these contractors, woman earn 77 cents on the dollar compared to men. In this episode, we investigate who these women are and what they stand to gain. Also, with the Nasdaq sliding we look at the Tech sectors value and what it means to the overall economy, considering it doesn't produce jobs. Plus: Amazon's created a device called Dash that can speed your oredering of groceries from Amazon Fresh, if you happem to be one of the few people who uses Amazon Fresh, which raises the question: Why do tech companies find it so challenging to be grocery stores? Afterall, some grocery stores already deliver and have been doing so for a while. 

 

04-04-2014- Marketplace-

The goal is always the same – so-called ‘full employment. But what would that actually look like? And what sort of jobs would predominate? Also,  Nest’s software failure shows that even the most high tech companies still rely on humans when everything fails, and for many wireless product firms, the human back end of their operations is considerable. We report on the manpower costs of providing a non-human product. Plus: When late night hosts change, everyone wants to know who the new guy (or gal – one day) will be. But what about the band? Mark Garrison reports on the way the late night bands are chosen, and what elevation to that esteemed slot can mean.   

04-03-2014- Marketplace- The ups and downs

Overdraft fees used to be a huge source of revenue for banks, then came the crackdown that required consumers to opt in to overdraft protection, and banks took a hit. But fees are climbing back up, and banks pulled in $32 billion in overdraft charges in 2012. We examine what has changed. Plus: ADP said this week that employers added 191,000 jobs in March. The report is a precursor to the federal figure out tomorrow, but critics have been hitting the ADP figure as something of a lagging indicator, ever since the company tweaked its formula back in 2012. We explain what sort of number this is, why people pay attention to it, and why it has some economists so riled up. Also, the owner of a Va. carpet cleaning company has sued Yelp to reveal the true identities of 7 anonymous reviewers who slammed his biz.  Will Yelp disclose these names? What would it mean for online reviews going forward, and what's at stake for a service like Yelp? Then, professional track and field athletes are preparing for collective action against the sport’s governing body that could lead some athletes to boycott the U.S. national track and field championships in June. The athletes’ demands are entangling sponsors such as Nike and Brooks Running, which use the affiliations to drive sales of shoes and other running gear.

04-02-2014- Marketplace- SCOTUS: Campaign Finance

In the case widely regarded as the sequel to the Citizens United campaign finance case, the Supreme Court has struck down the aggregate limit on what an individual can give in donations in a given an election cycle. Also, New York drops out of InBloom, the Gates Foundation’s $100 million effort at collecting student data, leaving it with no known customers. Since launching, seven states have dropped out.  Apparently, parents aren’t as eager as gates assumed  to have their kids data-mined at schools. Plus: We remember – briefly – Charles Keating, because he was one of the best-known faces of the S&L crisis of the late 80’s and early 90’s, in which 1,000 banks collapsed.