Morning Edition for Thursday, August 8, 2013

Less than eight weeks before the official launch of the new health care marketplaces, the Obama administration is ramping up efforts to encourage people to sign up. But some opponents want young people to pay a fine rather than sign up for health insurance, hoping to harm the new law.
President Obama, like his predecessors George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, has chafed at the conventions of communicating through the mainstream media. So while he uses print and broadcast every day, he and staff have sought out a host of non-traditional media means for reaching new audiences in new ways.
After being grounded for months, Boeing's 787 jetliner is back in the air. Boeing wants to ensure that those planes keep flying and get where they're supposed to be on time. To help do that, the company is monitoring the entire fleet of 787s in real time.
He may have lost a battle, but Gallic chieftain Vercingetorix won something greater: status a French national hero. Each summer, a Burgundy village holds a festival to mark the Gauls' defeat by Julius Caesar and the Roman army.

Working To Save The Painted 'Zonkeys' Of Tijuana

Americans once waited in line for the chance to be photographed atop the striped donkeys on this famed tourist strip. But 9/11, the recession and the Mexican drug war have stifled tourism and nearly put the "zonkeys" and their owners out of work. A new push is on to save the historic icons.
The program is part of a national push for science education among minorities. A U.S. Department of Commerce study found that blacks and Latinos are half as likely as whites to have a job in science or engineering.

JPMorgan Chase Faces Justice Department Probe

JPMorgan Chase revealed on Wednesday that it's facing criminal and civil investigations by the Justice Department. The bank says the investigations focus on sales of subprime mortgage securities in the years preceding the financial crisis.

Railroad In Deadly Canadian Crash Files Bankruptcy

The rail company involved in the explosion that killed 47 people in a small Quebec town last month has filed for bankruptcy. The bankruptcy is a direct result of the explosion, in which a run-away train carrying oil derailed and blew up not far from the Maine-Quebec border.
High-end electric automaker Tesla has beat Wall Streets expectations and turned a profit for the second quarter. But will that be enough to help give the company power to sustain for the long term?

Love Boat Reaches Its Final Destination

The cruise ship made famous by the TV show The Love Boat will end up in a scrap heap on the Turkish coast. A ship recycling company in Turkey bought the cruise liner for a little more than $3 million and will strip it for its parts and metal.
American military advisers in Cairo say the U.S. should stop sending F-16s to Egypt. Military contractors disagree.
On Wednesday, lawyers helping accused Fort Hood shooter Maj. Nidal Hasan asked to have their roles reduced. They told the judge they think Hasan is purposely trying to lose this trial.
Sioux Falls, S.D., gains thousands of new residents each year. Leaders point to business opportunities, diversity and quality of life as reasons for its growth. This kind of boom comes with conflict, and Sioux Falls faces challenges to continuing development.

Rain Pounds Missouri Town, Floods Rivers

In Missouri, several communities have been ravaged by flooding. Among the hardest hit has been Waynesville. The town of about 5,000 people has been hit by rain storms — including some 7 inches on Tuesday, and another 6 inches Wednesday. Nearby rivers and creeks have overflowed.
For years, cities and states have struggled to figure out what to do about the rise in ridesharing companies such as Uber and Lyft. California recently took the first steps toward legitimizing them, a move that could serve as a model for places also trying to catch up with the boom.

Kerry, Hagel To Meet Russian Counterparts On Friday

The U.S. has canceled plans for an Obama-Putin summit because Russia granted temporary asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden. But Secretary of State John Kerry and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel will go ahead with plans to meet their counterparts in Washington.
The former Soviet republic of Georgia passed an important test of democracy last year. After a bitter campaign, the government changed hands peacefully in a free election. But the losing party says democracy in Georgia is threatened because the new government is arresting officials from the old government and putting them on trial for corruption and abuse of power.
A group of Jewish and Muslim musicians who played together in the bars and cafes of Algiers in the 1940s and '50s thought they'd never see each other again. But after a chance encounter one of them had with a tourist in an Algerian bazaar, their lives changed forever.
Political strategists on both sides of the isle are working to get the progressive rock band Yes into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

'Magic Flute' Singers End Up In Lake Constance

In Mozart's opera The Magic Flute, Tamino and Pamina can't get married unless brave Tamino passes three tests. At a performance in Austria this week, the trials by silence and fire were no sweat — water turned out to be a bit trickier. A gondola carrying three characters capsized.
Find an archived Episode: