Morning Edition for Monday, August 12, 2013

Ahead Of Peace Talks, Israel Expands Settlements

Just days before U.S. brokered peace talks are to resume, the Israeli government has cleared the way for construction of more than a thousand new housing units in the occupied West Bank and Jerusalem. The move is sure to cast a shadow over the talks, but Israeli expectations for the talks are already very low.
Rawabi, a privately developed Palestinian community, sits in the West Bank. The first residents are due to move in later this year, but its developer is worried about water. To get a pipe laid, Rawabi needs Israeli permission. Israel has cooperated, but the Palestinian developer says the cooperation has been "very slow and always incomplete."

Killed For Taking Part In 'Everybody's Fight'

Sally Liuzzo-Prado was just 6 when her mother, Viola Liuzzo, was killed by Ku Klux Klansmen following marches in Alabama. The death of Liuzzo, the only white woman protester to die during the civil rights movement, captured the nation.
Download new music from hip-hop producer (and Kendrick Lamar collaborator) Terrace Martin, Justin Vernon's Volcano Choir project, the upstart Americana band Houndmouth, pop singer Carolyn Malachi and much more.
In Cairo, a large gathering of supporters of ousted President Morsi are anticipating clashes with security forces. Egypt's Ministry of Interior says the camps could come under siege at any time. Protesters have their own barricades in place in preparation.
From human growth hormone to EPO, many sports doping products these days come from big drug companies, not rogue chemists. Scientists and body builders warn that new drugs being developed to treat muscle wasting disease will also likely be abused by athletes — with little chance of detection.

U.S. Postal Service Reports Quarterly Losses

The U.S. postal service posted $740 million in losses last quarter — making it nearly $4 billion so far this year. These losses come despite major trims to the operating budget in 2013.
If you're a takeout or delivery customer, websites like Seamless and Grubhub are a marvel. Just type, click your order and the food is on its way. But if you're a restaurant, this shift to the web may not sit so well with you.

Sequestration Has Georgia Town On Edge

Warner Robins, Ga., is a booming community that is entirely dependent on civilian Defense Department employment. The local Air Force Base is massive, but because it's mostly a logistics depot, the bulk of the employees are not service members.

Premium Parking Space Comes With Big Price Tag

A parking spot in London is on the market for $465,000. That buys an outdoor location near Buckingham Palace and a 91-year lease.

Mexican Court Frees Drug Lord In DEA Agent's Death

The U.S. is furious over Mexico's early release of jailed drug lord Rafael Caro Quintero — who was serving a 40 year sentence for murdering a U.S. drug enforcement agent in 1985. Renee Montagne talks to Tracy Wilkinson, of the Los Angeles Times, who recaps the case, the milestone it represented in U.S.-Mexican relations and why a Mexican court freed Quintero early.
Years of rapid industrial expansion have left many parts of China contending with thick smog and dirty water. The move comes at a time when China is trying to shift away from the investment-led economic model that has generated such dizzying growth in recent years, but the global economic downturn has made the transition a lot more challenging.
Images from conflicts in 28 countries are now on view at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. "The more you've seen of death and inhumanity, the more it turns you into someone who really can't stand the sight of war," says photojournalist David Burnett.

Dufner Wins PGA Championship Over Furyk

Jason Dufner has won his first major golf title with a two-stroke victory over Jim Furyk at the PGA Championship. Dufner bogeyed the final two holes Sunday for a 2-under 68 that was good enough to hold off the 2003 U.S. Open champion. The winning score was 10-under 270.

For Disaster Preparedness: Pack A Library Card?

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, libraries in New York helped storm victims find documents, fill out forms, connect to the Internet, and plan how to rebuild, and there's a growing awareness of the important role libraries can play in disaster relief.

Wildfires Destroyed 'Big Chunks Of My Childhood'

Wildfires are raging across the West. Colorado resident and Morning Edition commentator Craig Childs, a veteran of many fires, describes the long-term damage to the landscape. Child's latest book is Apocalypse Planet: Field Guide to the Future of the Earth.

'One Night In Miami', More Than Clay Beats Liston

A new play tells the story of the night Cassius Clay, who changed his name to Muhammad Ali, beat Sonny Liston to take the world heavyweight title. It takes place in a hotel room after the fight where Clay, Sam Cooke, Malcolm X and Jim Brown talk about their lives, and their hopes for the future.

Artists Hope Aliens Have A Sense Of Humor

Two artists helped design a satellite to look like a giant gadget charger. There's an inscription: "Greetings Beleaguered Space Traveler. Welcome to the Universe's First Celestial Charging Station."
As part of his re-election campaign, the Norwegian prime minister went under cover as a cab driver for one day in June. A video of the stunt was just released. In it, some passengers are shocked to see their leader taking fares, others were just very critical about his driving skills.
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