Morning Edition for Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Money-strapped municipalities are increasingly sharing services with neighboring governments. Advocates say consolidating police, fire and other departments protect them from budget cuts. Critics worry about emergency response capabilities and wonder if the savings are really there.
When Detroit filed for bankruptcy protection last month, the people in Windsor, which is located directly across the Detroit River, took note. And while Detroit's economic troubles are far deeper than Windsor's, the two cities' economic fortunes are linked.

Retired Teacher Has Hope Poor Community Will Rebound

Renee Montagne and David Greene report on how a longtime teacher in Virginia has hope for her impoverished county. Tammy Smith retired this summer from 32 years in Dickenson County public schools. That county is one of the poorest in Virginia.

Judge: Stop-And-Frisk Policy Violates Rights

Reaction in New York has been mixed to Monday's court ruling over the NYPD's stop-and-frisk policy. A judge ruled the policy is unconstitutional and amounts to "indirect racial profiling" of young men of color.
Writer Kiese Laymon has had the kind of year every first-time author dreams. He's had two books published to critical acclaim. But to get where he is now, he experienced a rough patch. In an essay,"The Worst of White Folks," he recalls why he and his mother were at loggerheads.
The Affordable Care Act sets up categories of essential health benefits that insurance plans must cover. Some categories, such as maternity care and drug abuse treatment, are straightforward. But "habilitative services" — including treatments like physical and speech therapy — are much more subjective.

Colorado Vault Is Fort Knox For The World's Seeds

At Colorado State University, billions of seeds and other genetic material sit inside a giant storage vault. They're kept there in case of a loss of plant or animal life on a regional or global scale. But the investigation into GMO wheat in Oregon has raised questions about security at the facility.
A wild herd of bison has been roaming the rugged Santa Catalina Island since the 1920s, when they were brought there by a film crew shooting a movie that was never made. With no natural predators, the bison population quickly exploded. Scientists there are now using a unique birth control method to control the herd's size.

BlackBerry May Be Sold

BlackBerry was valued at more than $80 billion back in 2008. Then the iPhone and Android came along and stole its dominance of the smartphone market. Now BlackBerry is worth only about $5.4 billion and its market share is plummeting.

Greek Government Brings In More Money Than It Spends

Greece's government registered a $3.5 billion primary budget surplus for the first half of this year. It's a rare bit of good economic news for the country. The figure does not include interest payments, social security payments or local government debt. But the figure suggests that public financing is getting back on track.

Why Modern Latinas Are A Challenge To Marketers

The market research firm Nielsen has published a report on the Latina consumer. According to Nielsen, Hispanic women are a key growth engine in the American marketplace. The Latina population is growing while the white, non-Hispanic female population is dropping.

Flying Car Could Get You Where You Need To Be Fast

One way to beat bumper-to-bumper traffic is a vintage and very rare 1954 Aerocar, offered for sale by Courtesy Aircraft in Rockford, Ill. The vehicle converts from car to airplane in about 10 minutes and tops out at 60 miles per hour on land, 110 in the sky. The asking price just shy of $1 million.
In April, Secretary of State John Kerry turned an effort into recognizing the importance of South America into a gaffe when he referred to the region as the United States' "backyard." He's now in that backyard trying to build warmer relations with Colombia and Brazil.
Some aid workers are describing Syria as "the humanitarian crisis of this generation." United Nation's agencies are still struggling to get aid to rebel-held areas, and are seeking support in a divided U.N. Security Council.

Patients Can Pay A High Price For ER Convenience

Free-standing emergency rooms, separate from hospitals, are popping up across the country. Many look like urgent-care centers, but the ERs charge much more. Many consumers don't realize the difference until they get the bill.

A Closer Look At Elon Musk's Much-Hyped Hyperloop

Existing concepts in science like linear induction motors and magnetic levitation are back in the spotlight thanks to Elon Musk's proposal for a rail system that can travel faster than the speed of sound.

'Whitey' Bulger Found Guilty of Murder, Racketeering

A jury in Boston on Monday convicted mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger of 31 counts of racketeering and murder. Bulger ruled the city's underworld for nearly two decades.

Holder Unveils New Approach To Criminal Justice

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder outlined changes Monday to ease overcrowding prisons in a speech to the American Bar Association in San Francisco. David Greene talks to Ohio State University law professor Douglas Berman about the plan to ease mandatory sentences for drug offenders.

Atlanta Braves Find Another Use For Duct Tape

For the second time in two seasons, Atlanta Braves third baseman Chris Johnson was ejected from a game after arguing with an umpire and throwing his helmet. Next game, Johnson hit the field with a new piece of equipment: duct tape over his mouth.

Ohio Casino Acknowledges Mistake, Awards 2 Winners

Kevin Lewis of Cincinnati was announced the winner of a $1 million giveaway. The problem, the wrong Kevin Lewis came forward first. After the casino realized the mistake, officials gave both men the prize.
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