Morning Edition for Thursday, August 15, 2013

Gathering in Washington, D.C., drone manufacturers say they are optimistic about their business, despite a downturn in defense spending. The unmanned vehicle industry is hopeful the domestic market will open up. But they first must address privacy concerns exacerbated by the NSA spying scandal.
The use of drones in the war on terror has been getting a lot of attention. Morning Edition's Renee Montagne talks to author Mark Bowden about his article on the U.S. government's use of drones in this week's The Atlantic magazine. Bowden is the author of Black Hawk Down.
Millions of Americans have been living with relatives or renting, trying to ride out the Great Recession and the slow recovery. Those people may be now itching to buy homes before interest rates go up further. But some experts point to negative factors that could hold back a housing boom.
The average car on the road these days is more than 11 years old — a historic high. Some analysts say that means there soon will be a surge in car buying. Others are skeptical.
The fierce debate over immigration played out in earnest in Bakersfield, Calif., on Wednesday. Immigration overhaul supporters are pressuring Republican Rep. Kevin McCarthy to join them. While the House majority whip agrees the immigration system needs to change, he is unwilling to support the bill that passed the Senate.

Egypt Is Under A State Of Emergency

It was perhaps the bloodiest day in Egypt since the uprising in 2011. Security forces on Wednesday launched a major operation to clear supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi from two sit-in camps in Cairo but the violence quickly spread to other parts of the city.

Violent Crackdown Spread Beyond Cairo

The deadly confrontations in Egypt on Wednesday were not limited to Cairo. To find out what happened in the Egyptian city of Alexandria, David Greene talks to Mohammed Abushaqra, a civil society advocate.

2 Ex-Traders Accused Of Covering Up JPMorgan Losses

Federal prosecutors in the U.S. have charged two former traders in JPMorgan Chase's London office with securities fraud. The two men were part of the so-called "London Whale" case, which ended up costing the company more than $6 billion. U.S. officials say the men lied about the value of some derivatives trades to cover up mounting losses.
A Connecticut attorney has opened a shop that combines his passion for the law with his barber skills. Donald Howard says he first got the hybrid-business idea working as a paralegal for a personal injury attorney who doubled as a sports agent. And, a California attorney opened Legal Grind, a coffee house and law office.

Team Walks Florida's Beaches With Google Eye

Google Street View cars have been photographing roads and highways for years, but how about this: Google Beach View. Florida is paying a pair of intrepid trekkers to walk all 825 miles of the state's beachfront carrying the Google Eye camera in a 40 pound backpack — blue orb sticking out the top.
Hundreds of people were killed in Egypt Wednesday when armed forces cleared protest camps set up by backers of ousted President Morsi. David Greene talks to Steven Cook, senior fellow for Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, about the situation in Egypt.
Civil rights leaders meeting in Atlanta say states, including Texas and North Carolina, are deliberately trying to make it more difficult for voters. They're calling for a national campaign to strengthen voting rights, increase voter participation and eliminate long lines at the polls.
Jesse Jackson Jr. has been sentenced to 30 months in prison. The former Illinois congressman stole hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign funds to buy luxury items for himself and his family. His wife Sandra Jackson received a year in prison for filing false tax returns.

Teens Use Twitter To Thumb Rides

Need a ride to the party or the concert? Instead of making endless phone calls, these days teens turn to social media to arrange transportation. It's called ridesharing, a form of cyber-hitchhiking used by a generation that isn't rushing to get a driver's license or dream car.
Smart windows change how much sunlight they let through on a hot day. Such windows could reduce the demand for energy by reducing the need for air conditioning. This quest has been going on for years but it's got years to go before the project becomes a reality.
David Greene talks to Dave Dishneau, a reporter with The Associated Press, about Army Private Bradley Manning's apology at his sentencing hearing in the WikiLeaks case. On Wednesday, he apologized for hurting his country by divulging reams of classified information.
Ten years after a cascading power outage across a broad section of the U.S. and Canada, utility operators and regulators are concerned about another blackout scenario: a massive cyberattack that could threaten the U.S. electric grid.
Private investigator Kinsey Millhone is one of the most well-known characters in modern crime fiction, but there's another star in Sue Grafton's thrillers: the fictional city of Santa Teresa, based on Santa Barbara, Calif.

Ohio University Houses Students At Waterpark Resort

Capital University, outside Columbus, was gearing up for the new school year when the administration found itself with a slippery situation. There weren't enough dorm rooms on campus. But a local business dove in with a solution. Thirty students will stay at Fort Rapids Indoor Waterpark Resort until space opens up on campus.

Word Usage Heats Up Internet, 'Literally'

Traditionally, literally means something that is strictly true. Google's dictionary, bloggers noticed, says you can also use it for emphasis. Like, "I would literally give my right arm to own a pickup truck." Grammar sticklers claim Google has sided with language traitors and broken the English language.
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