Morning Edition for Friday, August 16, 2013

It's the first day of school in Moore, Oklahoma. In May, a massive tornado ripped across town, killing 24 and obliterating homes, businesses and two schools. Schools there didn't have storm shelters, but districts across Oklahoma are beginning to make changes.

NASA Deems Kepler Space Telescope Beyond Repair

Two of the four gyroscope-like wheels that keep Kepler pointed in the right direction aren't working. NASA is exploring whether there might be other research projects the hobbled space probe can still carry out.

Fox Launches 24-Hour Sports Network On Saturday

For years, ESPN has been the dominant name in sports broadcasting, not to mention the most profitable bundle of channels on cable television. But it will face its first serious challenge when Fox launches its 24-hour national sports network.

Time Warner Cable Customers Miss Out On CBS

For two weeks, customers with Time Warner Cable in New York, Los Angeles and Dallas have been unable to watch CBS with their cable box. Time Warner and CBS disagree over how much the cable company should be paying the television network for transmitting its shows.

Athletes Speak Out Against Russia's Anti-Gay Law

Controversy over Russia's new anti-gay law is affecting this year's World Athletic Championships. Athletes who are in Moscow for the games are speaking out about the law. How athletes are reacting could be a test for what's to come at the Sochi Olympics.

Movie Review: 'Lee Daniels' The Butler'

The new movie Lee Daniels' The Butler stars Forest Whitaker and Oprah Winfrey in a story that took five years and 37 producers to bring to the screen. The film is inspired by the real life career of a White House employee who served eight presidents.

Obama Condemns Crackdown In Egypt

President Obama is canceling joint military exercises with Egypt and condemning the violence that is taking place there. But the administration has stopped short of suspending aid to the Egyptian military. The U.S. faces a policy conundrum in Egypt, which has long played a key role in regional stability.

Ford Lowers Mileage Rating On C-Max Hybrid

On Thursday, Ford issued a statement lowering the vehicle's stated performance for combined city and highway to 43 miles per gallon. The car had been advertised at 47 miles per gallon in combined city and highway driving, but tests reportedly showed the figure to be inflated.

Stock Market Falls As U.S. Economy Does Better

The stock market has lost about 3.5 percent of its value since the beginning of the month. For insight into why the decline, David Greene talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.

'Headless' Headline Writer Gets The Axe

After more than 40 years at the New York Post, Vincent Musetto has been let go. There's a chance you've read some of the headlines he wrote. The most famous, from 1983, has been called one of the greatest headlines of all time: "Headless Body In Topless Bar." It's been printed in on T-shirts, taught in journalism classes and written about in books.

Egypt's Army To Use Live Ammunition To Keep Order

Egypt's Interior Ministry has authorized the use of deadly force against protesters targeting police and state institutions. The death toll has surpassed 600 since Wednesday and spread outside the bloody crackdown in Cairo against supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.
The Muslim Brotherhood has called for a mass rally on Friday in a challenge to the government's declaration of a month-long state of emergency and a dusk-to-dawn curfew. David Greene talks to Mona al-Qazzaz, a spokeswoman for the Muslim Brotherhood in London.
Werner Herzog's latest project is a slight departure for the acclaimed filmmaker: a 35-minute public service announcement on the dangers of texting and driving. Yes, it's long, he says, but the "inner landscape" of great suffering such accidents can cause "can only be shown if you have more time."

Riding Choppers And Harleys To Protect Kids In Need

Bikers may have a tough image, but Happy Dodson, Taz Roman and other members of Bikers Against Child Abuse have a soft spot for kids. The international nonprofit accepts referrals from parents, police and social workers, and if those kids ever feel unsafe, BACA members will come roaring to their aid.
Relentless drought will force the government to cut back on water releases between Glen Canyon and Lake Mead. It's the first time that's happened since dams were built on the Colorado River. Reduction starts next year, and the announcement gives the 40 million water users in the Southwest time to plan.

White Man Rises Up Ranks Of Asian Gang In Boston

In Massachusetts Thursday, John Willis was sentenced in federal court to 20 years in prison for money laundering and drug charges. Willis formed unlikey ties with one of Boston's Asian gangs after joining a Chinese family and learning to speak Cantonese as a teenager.

Doctors Without Borders To Pull Out Of Somalia

The international humanitarian group Doctors Without Borders has announced it will leave Somalia after 22 years on the ground in the troubled East African country. The group says both armed militias and civilian leadership are complicit in attacks on their workers. David Greene talks with the group's international president Unni Karunakara.
The stringy red spice is actually the dried stigma of a saffron flower. "It's exotic, it's expensive," says The New York Times columnist and cookbook author, but "it should be used."

Chinese Zoo Substitutes Dog For Lion

A mother taking her son around a zoo in China thought her boy was mistaken when he pointed out the barking lion. But he was right. The zoo had taken their African lion away for breeding, and moved in an employee's large and hairy mastiff dog.

Not So Unusual: Bat Found At Atlanta's Turner Field

What was unusual, was that the bat was moving and flapping its wings. It eventually flew away.
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