Morning Edition for Monday, August 19, 2013

Members Of Congress Urged To Cut Aid To Egypt

The U.S. has been unable to do much to reduce the violence in Egypt. President Obama canceled upcoming joint military exercises, and says the administration is looking at other options, perhaps affecting the $1.5 billion in military aid the U.S. provides Egypt each year. For more insight, Renee Montagne talks to Nathan Brown, a scholar of Middle East politics with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and George Washington University.

N.Y. Art Dealer Faces Charges In Forgery Case

Long Island art dealer Glafira Rosales is scheduled to be arraigned Monday on charges of money laundering and wire fraud. Prosecutors say Rosales was involved in selling $80 million worth of counterfeit Modernist paintings that turned out to be the work of one anonymous painter.

For You To Borrow, Some Libraries Have To Go Begging

Most Americans say public libraries are important to the community — but eight states don't actually support them. Texas has cut budgets drastically; in Vermont, local librarians must go hand in hand to town meetings every year. Neda Ulaby reports on the landscape of library funding across the U.S.
Manufacturing is increasingly being done with robotic power tools that cost tens of thousands of dollars. They're known as CNC or computer-numerical-control machines. A California company is making low-cost CNC machines that will help in the classroom.
The federal health care law requires young people to sign up for coverage. The health insurance premiums of younger, healthier adults will be important to balancing the cost of covering older, sicker Americans.
Think buying health insurance through the Affordable Care Act will be confusing? You're not alone. NPR listeners asked questions that have been bugging them about student status options and penalties. Julie Rovner, NPR's health policy correspondent, explains how it's going to work.

JPMorgan Chase's Hiring Practices In Asia Probed

The Securities and Exchange Commission reportedly has opened a bribery investigation into whether JPMorgan Chase hired the children of powerful Chinese officials to help the bank win lucrative business. JPMorgan says it is fully cooperating with investigators.
It's been nearly 10 months since Superstorm Sandy hit the Northeast — and coastal communities are still trying to rebuild. Many homeowners are turning to building professionals to reduce the risk of future floods. But in doing so, architects and designers may be exposing themselves to legal risk.
The average cost of an American wedding cost more than $28,000 last year. Travelers insurance is now offering wedding insurance. There's coverage for failed wedding pictures, the caterer goes out of business, gifts go missing, etc.
After a week's vacation, President Obama is back at the White House planning a bus tour later this week to promote his economic and educational policies. The president comes home to increased pressure from both political parties to get tougher with the Egyptian military.

The Japanese-American Internee Who Met Malcolm X

A chance encounter with Malcolm X in 1963 sparked a friendship that helped inspire a lifelong commitment to activism for Yuri Kochiyama, a former Japanese-American World War II internee who participated in the 1960s civil rights movement.

Has Voyager 1 Left The Solar System?

For the past decade or so, we have been waiting for the Voyager 1 spacecraft to leave the solar system. New research suggests it already has, and over a year ago.

Hitting The Road Without A Driver

Engineers at Carnegie Mellon University are developing the ultimate in automotive sophistication: the driverless car. When NPR's Brian Naylor went there to check it out, he thought he'd be going for a spin on a test track. No, the car drove itself through suburbia.

Wild Horses Run Free As Adoption Centers Fill Up

Across the West, the Bureau of Land Management grapples with dwindling holding space for wild horses it has rounded up. But advocates say the bureau's housing of mustangs is not only ineffective but unsustainable. The cost of keeping the horses has tripled since 2000.
American citizen Kenneth Bae has spent nearly 10 months imprisoned in North Korea. That's longer than any other American held there in recent years. Bae was recently moved to a hospital for ailments related to diabetes, an enlarged heart and liver problems. Bae's family says the situation is more urgent than ever.
Ai Weiwei, the world-renowned Chinese artist and dissident, has created a deeply autobiographical work for the Venice Biennale exhibit. It is a series of dioramas about his life as a political prisoner, when he was jailed for criticizing the corruption and shoddy construction that caused the deaths of 5,000 children when schools collapsed in the 2008 Sichuan earthquake.
It's an expected sight in the Afghan capital: a hundred boys and girls — on foot, stilts and unicycles — juggling tennis balls and batons. The parade was part of the national juggling championship. Organizers hope juggling builds self-confidence in children who've known only war in their lifetimes.

Sun, Sand And The Seine: The Beach Comes To Paris

Each summer, 5,000 tons of sand and nearly 100 palm trees transform a half-mile stretch along river into a beach paradise with volleyball, ice cream stands and sunbathing. Especially now, Paris Plage is a real boon for those who can't afford a more extravagant vacation.

Redheads Flock To Portland For world Record Attempt

More than 1,300 people with red hair gathered in Portland, Oregon, over the weekend, which the city hopes is a new world record. To qualify, participants had to produce pictures of their younger selves and their naturally red hair.

What Do You Do When Your Cable TV Goes Out?

Here's one thing not to do: call 911. Police in Fairfield, Conn., had to remind residents Sunday night that a cable drop-out is not "an emergency or a police-related concern." They added that misusing the 911 system can result in arrest.
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