Morning Edition for Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Shooting At D.C.'s Navy Yard Leaves 12 Workers Dead

A shooting at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. killed 13 people including the shooter. By late Monday, authorities said they were convinced the shooting was the work of a lone gunman, and the lockdown around the area was eased.
Police say the gunman, 34-year-old Aaron Alexis, died after a gun battle inside a building at the Navy Yard on Monday. He was a veteran with a history of gun-related incidents. His last known address was in Fort Worth, Texas.

Fed Meeting Could Lead To Stimulus Reduction

Many economic analysts expect the Federal Reserve to announce the first reduction in its stimulus program on Wednesday. The Fed has been pumping money into the financial system by purchasing U.S. government bonds and mortgage-backed-securities.

Rain Stops In Colorado But Devastation Remains

Air rescues have resumed in Colorado's Boulder and Larimer counties, sending a stream of evacuees to shelters around the region. Also, more federal resources are beginning to become available. Additionally, flooding is beginning to work its way into the plains of eastern Colorado.

Floods Make Many Roads In Colorado Impassable

Portions of Bellview, Colo., are entirely cut off by flooding. Resident Mark Benjamin has been helping neighbors by rigging a zipline across floodwaters to transport supplies. He talks with Steve Inskeep about the condition of Bellview's roads — and what it will take to rebuild them.

Washington, D.C. Copes With Navy Yard Tragedy

The deadly shooting rampage at the Navy Yard on Monday happened less than four miles from the White House and two miles from the Capitol. "This is a horrific tragedy," Mayor Vincent Gray said.

Telomeres May Hold Clues To Effects Of Aging

Scientists are reporting an advance in the science of aging — and maybe even a clue on how to reverse some of aging's effects. They have evidence that lifestyle changes already known to be good for you — healthy diet, exercise, reducing stress — may prevent the chromosomes in our cells from unraveling. It's all about little caps on our chromosomes called telomeres.

Financial Crisis Recovery Has Been Bumpy For Some

Five years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, President Obama is touting an economic comeback. But he says the country still has a long way to go to restore prosperity for the middle class. He warned Republicans in Congress not to impede the recovery by staging another showdown over the debt ceiling.

American Farmers Say They Feed The World, But Do They?

Farmers say they need to produce food as efficiently as possible in order to feed the world. It's high-tech agriculture's claim to the moral high ground in the debate over how best to grow food. But is it true?

JPMorgan To Get Whale Of A Fine For Trading Losses

The fine is reportedly said to be at least $700 million for what authorities say were massive derivative bets made without adequate risk controls in place. The case became known as the "London Whale" owing to the size of the trades made.
Each summer, the rice farmers of Narita, Japan, gather to pray for bountiful harvests with dancing, music and elaborate festival carts. This year, some farmers feel their way of life is under threat from a major trade agreement.

Hello Kitty Pitches Beer

The Japanese company Sanrio has licensed the pudgy face cartoon cat to a Taiwanese beverage maker which is selling fruit-flavored beer in China and Taiwan. Sanrio dismissed claims that the beer is being pitched to underage consumers.

Navy Yard Shooting Deadliest Rampage Since Fort Hood

A defense-industry employee used his pass to get into the Washington Navy Yard and went on a deadly shooting spree on Monday. The motive for the assault is not known at this time. Thirteen people were killed — including the gunman.

Victims Of Navy Yard Shooting Are Being Identified

Officials have released the names of seven out of 12 people killed in the Washington Navy Yard shootings. Police say Aaron Alexis, a defense-industry employee, went on a shooting rampage Monday. The gunman was killed in a shootout with police.
John Lippert, an investigative reporter for Bloomberg Markets magazine, traced the violence in Chicago back to Mexico. Lippert talks to Steve Inskeep about the impact of the Sinaloa drug cartel's dominance over the drug trade in Chicago and the Midwest.

Ear Wax From Whales Keeps Record Of Ocean Contaminants

Layers of wax in the marine mammals' ears can be read like tree rings, scientists say, recording a whale's age and also information about pollutants in the water the whale swam through. Wax from a blue whale that washed ashore in 2007 contained surprisingly high levels of DDT.

Mission Success: Costa Concordia Is Vertical

In an operation that took 19 hours, the luxury cruise ship Costa Concordia is now in an upright position. The ship ran aground in January 2012 off the coast of Tuscany.
U.N. weapons inspectors have issued their report on last month's chemical weapons attack in Syria. Anthony Cordesman, of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, tells Steve Inskeep that the report bolsters U.S. and European charges that the Assad regime deployed the sarin gas.
For online insurance brokers, selling health insurance through the Affordable Care Act presents a new opportunity — and a new competitor. It's unclear who will come out ahead: the businesses, with more experience, or the feds, who won't charge commissions.
Author Anya Von Bremzen's new memoir, Mastering The Art of Soviet Cooking, is a tragic-comic history of a family and a nation as seen through the kitchen window. Everything we ate in the Soviet Union was grown ... by the party state," she says. "So, with the food, inevitably, you ingested the ideology."

Employee Gives School Principal Pot As A Gift

The head of a Rhode Island school was named Providence Principal of the Year. Police say an employee, Christopher Michael Sheehan, gave his boss a present to celebrate. He allegedly handed the principal a half-ounce of marijuana. Sheehan was arrested.

Hawaiian Woman Complains Her Long Name Was Cut Off On IDs

Janice Lokelani Keihanaikukauakahihuliheekahaunaele, who goes by Loke, complained to a Honolulu radio station that since her name was so long, it was always cut off on IDs. That led to issues with travel and police. Officials in Hawaii say the state is expanding the character limit of names on IDs.
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