Morning Edition for Tuesday, October 1, 2013

In his interview with President Obama on Monday, NPR's Steve Inskeep says some of the president's remarks were reminiscent of what he said in 2011, during the debt ceiling crisis. One stark difference, however, was the president's firmness. "Absolutely I will not negotiate," the president said.

Netanyahu Urges World To Keep Pressure On Iran

A day after a meeting with President Obama, Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu takes center stage at the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday. He will likely dwell on Iran's suspect nuclear program and warn the world community against being taken in by Tehran's recent charm offensive.

Ethical Tradition Meets Economics In An Aging China

As people around the world live longer, many nations are having to find new ways to care for their aging populations. In China, a new law requires adult offspring to visit and look after their elderly parents. China's one-child policy complicates the issue further, and some dismiss the law as another attempt to legislate morality by a government that is riddled with corruption.

Examining The Psychology Of Sports Fans

Some sports fans' lives depend on how well their teams are doing. In one theory, sports allow us to deeply identify with the athletes so it feels like we are playing the game.
In the three years since President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act into law, the measure has survived more than 50 votes in Congress to defund or repeal it, a Supreme Court challenge and a presidential election. Obamacare goes operational on Tuesday. It's only fitting that it opens for business on the same day the government is shutting down because Congress is having a big fight over this divisive law.

Widening Income Gap 'Concerns' Obama

Steve Inskeep talks to President Obama about the widening gap between rich and poor in the U.S. The president says the decades-long trend has accelerated because of globalization and technology. Because of those two factors, a lot of manufacturing jobs have left the U.S.

Amazon To Hire More Workers Than Last Holiday Season

Amazon has announced that it's looking to hire 70,000 full-time temporary employees for the holiday season. That's a 40 percent increase in hires from last year. The world's largest online retailer says it hopes to convert thousands of these seasonal jobs into permanent positions after the holiday rush.

Financial Markets Monitor Partial Federal Shutdown

Financial markets across the world took a hit on Monday. They closed lower — waiting to see if there was a partial government shutdown in the U.S. Shortly before midnight, the White House ordered agencies to begin shutting down.

Study: Fast Food Has Gotten A Bit Slower

It may be fast food, but it's taking longer than ever in the drive-thru lane. A study conducted by an industry trade magazine finds the major chains are offering more complicated menu items that take longer to assemble and are tougher to get right.

Ikea To Offer Solar Panels In British Stores

The Sweden-based company plans to roll out solar panels in 17 British stores over the next 10 months. The company does say the solar panels will look like flat screen televisions on your roof. Basic solar packages will be sold for more than $9,000.

House, Senate Stay Faithful To Their Measures

Before parts of the government began shutting down, the House and Senate bounced a series of stopgap spending bills between the chambers. The House would insert language to delay or limit the president's health care law, and the Senate would reject the Obamacare language and send the bill back. The two chambers did not reach an agreement before the midnight deadline.

As Partial Shutdown Begins, A Bigger Fight Looms

A default on federal obligations could have global effects. Federal borrowing authority expires in the middle of this month. House Republicans have said they will not extend the debt ceiling unless President Obama accepts a long list of their agenda items. Steve Inskeep talks to the president about the deadline to raise the debt ceiling.
Seven years ago, the state of Massachusetts launched its own experiment with health insurance exchanges. Those involved in that experiment say it's gone smoothly, and as a result, 97 percent of the state's residents now have health coverage. Some called the program Romneycare; some still do.
Hockey superstar Alex Ovechkin was among the first torch bearers for the 2014 Olympics that will be held in the Black Sea resort of Sochi. David Greene talks to Ovechkin about the various challenges ahead for the Winter Games, as well as the upcoming hockey season.
Two Marine Corps generals have been asked to resign over an incident in Afghanistan a year ago. Taliban insurgents made their way onto a sprawling base and attacked NATO forces. Two Americans died and six Marine fighter jets were destroyed. The two generals reprimanded in the matter were found to bear responsibility for underestimating the threat to base security.
Much of the federal government is in the process of shutting down. With Congress unable to agree on a stop-gap spending bill, money for continuing operations ran out at midnight. Hundreds of thousands of government employees have been told to stop working — although President Obama says some vital functions will continue.
The focal point of the fight over continued funding for the federal government has been the effort by conservatives in the House to defund the Affordable Care Act. Enrollment begins Tuesday. Steve Inskeep talks to Arizona Republican David Schweikert, one of the House members who has supported the effort to defund the law known as Obamacare.
Kicking off a week of stories on Morning Edition about the extraordinarily talented children often known as prodigies, NPR's David Greene spends a few minutes with a preteen musician who has already performed at Carnegie Hall and the White House.

Russian President Vladimir Putin Takes On Zombies

There's a new video game about to launch called "You Don't Mess With Putin." In it, the Russian leader battles some unlucky zombies at a news conference. But no superhero can do it alone. His sidekick? A hard-drinkin' American who goes by the name Comrade Mike.

Nail Gun Victim Lives To Tell The Tale

Eugene Rakow is a carpenter who shot himself in the heart with a nail gun. Doctors removed the nail and gave it to him as a souvenir. According to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, the surgeon said Rakow was amazingly lucky. "Nine out of 10 people won't make it," according to the surgeon.
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