Morning Edition for Monday, October 7, 2013

The United States military struck twice over the weekend in Africa. Commando raids in Somalia and Libya targeted terrorists. The mission in Libya resulted in the capture of a top al-Qaida operative. He was a key figure in bombings of two U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania back in 1998. The outcome in Somalia is not as clear.
A Kenyan intelligence official says that the "high-value terrorist leader" whose residence was targeted in a Navy SEAL raid was the senior al-Shabab leader Abdikadir Mohamed Abdikadir, alias Ikrima. Ikrima is a Kenyan of Somali descent who boasts connections to both al-Shabab in Somalia and to a Kenyan jihadist group called al-Hijra.

Deadly Street Battles Raged Across Egypt

More than 50 people are dead after security forces and Islamist protesters clashed. Supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi and backers of the military that deposed him poured into the streets and turned on each other. Sunday's death toll was the highest on a single day since Aug. 14 when security forces raided two sit-in protest camps by Morsi supporters, killing hundreds.
A partial shutdown of the federal government is now in its seventh day. At the heart of the impasse is a political battle. For the government to re-open, Republicans are insisting on big changes to President Obama's signature health care law. This is not the first time there's been GOP resistance to a new social welfare program that was advocated and signed into law by a Democratic president.

Pacific Northwest Farmers In Search Of More Workers

The Pacific Northwest grows the majority of the nation's pears, and they're predicted to have the third-largest harvest in history. But farmers are facing a shortfall that's been plaguing many agricultural industries — not enough workers to pick the fruit.
Anorexia and bulimia, once thought to be eating disorders affecting girls and women, affect a growing number of boys and men. Boys as young as 9 and 10 are feeling the pressure to be ripped and muscular, psychologists say. But they can have a hard time finding a treatment program geared to males.

A Gain For Airbus Is A Loss For Boeing

Japan Airlines has announced it's ordering 31 wide-body jets from Europe's major airplane manufacturer. It's a deal worth $9.5 billion. It's a huge sale for Airbus and a big blow for America's Boeing, which for decades has dominated sales to Japanese airlines.
Millions of U.S. factory jobs have been lost in the past decade. Now, in North Carolina, high school students are being encouraged to think about taking manufacturing jobs. But this isn't the furniture-making or textile labor of generations past — it's a new kind of highly technical work in aviation.
Leaders of Asia-Pacific countries are wrapping up an economic summit in Indonesia. Much of the talk in the region over the weekend focused on the event's big no show: President Obama. Because of the partial government shutdown in the U.S., the president decided to stay at home and monitor developments.

Updated $100 Bill To Enter Circulation

The Federal Reserve estimates that up to two-thirds of all U.S. C -notes are circulating abroad at any given time. The bill is also the most counterfeited. Federal officials are confident the new bill will be much harder to fake.

Politics Within The GOP Keeps Shutdown In Motion

As the partial government shutdown nears the start of its second week, Democrats say the only way out is for House Republicans to pass a clean spending bill to re-open the government with no changes to the Affordable Care Act. Some Republicans agree. So why don't moderate House Republicans rise up, and do something to end the shutdown?
This is Day 7 of the partial government shutdown, and there does not appear to be a resolution in sight. Why are the two sides so dug in?
Brothers Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru take an exhaustive look at how the NFL has dealt with allegations that playing football can lead to brain damage. They say the NFL has repeatedly avoided tying football to brain injury, even as they've given disability payments to former players with dementia-related conditions.

Nobel Prize Awarded In Medicine

Americans James Rothman and Randy Schekman and German-born researcher Thomas Suedhof have won the 2013 Nobel Prize in medicine. The Nobel committee cited their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells.
The docket this year has nothing quite as riveting as last year's same-sex-marriage cases, or the challenge to President Obama's health care overhaul from the term before. But once again, the court is facing hot-button social issues and questions of presidential and congressional power.

What's The Cost Of Budget Gridlock?

Renee Montagne talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, about the cost of the government shutdown, and the dangers of the threatened government default.
Bo Burnham got his start in comedy on the internet, rather than in clubs. He found fame on YouTube and parlayed millions of views into a thriving career. Now, he's turned to the printed page with Egghead: or, You Can't Survive On Ideas Alone, a collection of comedic poetry modeled on Shel Silverstein.

Lights Go Out During Ravens' News Conference

A blackout delayed last season's Super Bowl as the Baltimore Ravens defeated San Francisco. As the Raven's coach was taking questions Sunday, the room was plunged into darkness. Quarterback Joe Flacco accidentally leaned on a light switch. Later, linebacker Terrell Suggs did the same thing.
The bear had eaten all the borscht before the owners spotted him and called police. The culprit fled into the forest.
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