Morning Edition for Tuesday, October 22, 2013

The easy answer is that computer glitches stalled the launch of the Affordable Care Act health exchanges. But it's not as simple as that. The Obama administration lost valuable time waiting for a Supreme Court decision, a presidential election and state health exchange plans.
The federal government's beleaguered health care exchange site, HealthCare.gov, shares little in common with the e-commerce sites consumers use every day. On most e-commerce sites, prices are simple to find. Not so on HealthCare.gov. And that may be one of the reasons relatively few visitors to the site have actually enrolled.

World War II Veteran Honored Decades Later

World War II veteran Phillip Coon received three medals Monday night in a quiet ceremony at Tulsa International Airport.
One year ago the Michigan apple harvest, hurt by a winter warm-up and a late spring freeze, was almost nonexistent at 3 million bushels. This fall the crop is projected to yield a record-setting 30 million bushels.

A Sneak Peek At Juana Molina's 'Wed 21'

NPR Music's First Listen gives you the chance to hear an upcoming album in its entirety before it's released. Bob Boilen and Robin Hilton, hosts of NPR's All Songs Considered, talk about one of the new albums featured this week: Argentine musician Juana Molina's Wed 21.
Colorado ski towns are gearing up to sell recreational marijuana this winter during ski season. Resort towns overwhelmingly support legalization and say they don't see it hurting the state's multibillion-dollar tourism business. But there are those who worry pot shops will keep families away and hurt the bottom line.
Amnesty International released a new report on Tuesday on U.S. drone strikes along Pakistan's chaotic border region with Afghanistan.
A Supreme Court ruling paved the way for same-sex married couples to receive federal benefits. Now Justice Department lawyers are working to make it happen. It's a challenge because they have more than 1,000 rules and laws to review.

Transit Strike Ends In San Francisco Bay Area

A deal was announced late Monday ending the four-day strike that had stranded riders of Bay Area Rapid Transit. BART management called the deal a good one for union members while allowing for new infrastructure spending on the rail system in the future. This was the second strike to hit BART this year alone.

Grocery Workers To Stay On The Job In Seattle Area

Grocery workers in the Seattle metro area have reached a deal with their employers to avert a strike. Proposed cuts to health insurance were a big reason they almost walked out.

Seattle Suburb Considers Setting $15 'Living Wage'

The tiny Seattle suburb of SeaTac, home to the airport of the same name, is the latest front in the battle for "living wage" ordinances. On this fall's ballot is a measure mandating a $15 an hour floor for large hospitality and transportation companies. $15 is higher than the base wage in neighboring suburbs, but the heart of economic activity in SeaTac is the international airport — and that's not about to move.
Chinese state-run media is accusing Starbucks of charging more for coffee in China than other markets. According to a report, a small — or tall — latte sells for about $4.50 in Beijing. Compare that to $3.43 for the same latte in Brooklyn.

Shutdown-Delayed Jobs Report To Be Released

On Tuesday, the Labor Department will release the monthly jobs report — more than two weeks later than usual. The September report was delayed by the government shutdown.

Charity Watchdog Shakes Up Ratings To Focus On Results

Charity Navigator's ratings system currently looks at how much a nonprofit spends on its programs versus its overhead. Beginning in 2016, the rating will also factor in a group's effectiveness. But some nonprofits argue that results can be hard to measure — especially if you're working in a war zone.

Women Break New Ground In Marine Infantry Training

Female Marines have been training for the past month at Camp Lejeune, trying to make it through infantry training. They've got a month to go, including a 12-mile hike with a heavy pack. They're the first ones ever to handle the training, part of an effort to integrate women into combat positions by 2016.
Since 1980, the percentage of women at the U.S. Military Academy has stayed largely the same, leading some to conclude that the school has set an artificial cap on the number of female cadets that it accepts. Now, West Point has been told it must raise those numbers to meet the demand for more female leaders.

Australian Wildfires Threaten Sydney

Sydney, Australia, is suffering under a blanket of smoke and officials are sounding air quality alerts because of vast wildfires in the area. And it's still early in the fire season. Steve Inskeep talks to Stuart Cohen for the latest.
Voters across Israel choose new mayors and city councilors in local elections on Tuesday. In one small town, a handful of ultra-Orthodox Jewish women are defying the norms of their community by running for office.
In commemoration of the 10th anniversary of StoryCorps, we hear again from Ken Morganstern, who shared some of his last memories with his daughters during a 2006 interview.
Janet Hamlin was the only courtroom sketch artist allowed at the Guantanamo Bay military tribunals. Her work has been collected in a new book, Sketching Guantanamo — and she tells NPR's Renee Montagne that getting Khalid Sheikh Mohammed's nose right ended up being a challenge.

Man Goes Deer Hunting In Wal-Mart Parking Lot

When a man in Indiana, Pa., spotted a deer in the Wal-Mart parking lot, he shot it right there. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reports he got six months' probation, even though it was, in fairness, the first day of hunting season.

Fake Jerseys Work In A Pinch For Bogota Soccer Team

Walk around any city in Colombia and you'll find vendors selling counterfeit soccer jerseys. That came in handy for Bogota's Independiente Santa Fe team. They showed up for an away game in the wrong color, so a team official bought knockoffs from vendors.
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