Morning Edition for Thursday, October 24, 2013

Hearings On Obamacare Rollout Kick Off On Capitol Hill

The first of what is likely to be many congressional hearings on the Affordable Care Act rollout happens Thursday. After more than three weeks, consumers trying out the new health care exchanges have complained of delays, inaccurate information and other computer problems. House Republicans are determined to shine a spotlight on the bungles.
In the past, many psychotherapists ran their own little businesses. But changes in health care coverage mean that many must start accepting insurance and doing paperwork. That's leading some therapists to form group practices or join large medical groups — and may lead to better care for patients.

eBay Founder Explains His Venture Into Journalism

Pierre Omidyar, the founder of eBay, is the latest tech giant to make a bold bet on the future of journalism. Renee Montagne talks with the entrepreneur-philanthropist about his $250 million media venture.

Following Bloomberg's Lead, Mexico Aims To Fight Fat

In the battle against the bulge, lawmakers in Mexico are taking aim at consumers' pocketbooks. They're proposing a series of new taxes on high-calorie food and sodas. Health advocates say the higher prices will get Mexicans to change bad habits, but the beverage industry and small businesses are fighting back.

How One D.C. Suburb Set A Gold Standard For Commuting

It may come as a surprise to riders on Metro's Orange Line in Arlington, Va., just outside Washington, D.C., but the area sets the bar for suburban transit. A decision in the 1960s to run the subway under this area transformed it from downtrodden to vibrant. But for a community so dependent on the subway, is this as good as it gets?

Bank Of America Found Liable For Fraud

A jury in New York found Bank of America liable for fraud Wednesday after a monthlong civil trial. The verdict was considered a win for the Justice Department's prosecution of misdeeds during the financial crisis.
Harvard professor Anita Elberse's new book Blockbusters examines the strategy behind making and marketing megahits. She tells NPR's Renee Montagne that content companies — publishers, movie studios and the like — can create blockbusters by dedicating most of their budgets to a select few likely winners.

Collector's Rare $10 Bill Could Be Worth $500,000

Currency collector Billy Baeder owns what might be the most valuable piece of currency printed since 1929. His $10 bill — a 1933 silver certificate — is one of a small batch the government released, then tried to remove from circulation. His bill also has a rare serial number, making it worth an estimated $500,000.
The U.S. is expected to provide equipment to destroy most of Syria's 1,000-ton chemical weapons stockpile, based on a deal negotiated with Russia. But there are plenty of obstacles. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman talks to Renee Montagne about the efforts to destroy Syria's chemical weapons.
NPR's correspondents in Shanghai and New Delhi, Frank Langfitt and Julie McCarthy, talk with Steve Inskeep about a recent summit between Indian and Chinese leaders. Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang signed an agreement on border cooperation, but had little else of significance to show at the end of their meeting.

Teacher Killed By 12-Year-Old Student Remembered

The community of Sparks, Nev., came together Wednesday night to remember Michael Landsberry, the teacher who was killed by a 12-year-old student who shot and wounded two others before taking his own life.

Krauthammer's Tactical Advice For The Republican Party

Charles Krauthammer once was a psychiatrist and a self-described "Great Society liberal." Now he's a Pulitzer Prize-winning, nationally syndicated conservative columnist. His new book, Things That Matter, presents a selection of his writings from three decades spent observing politics and culture.

Red Sox Take One-Game Lead In World Series

The Red Sox won the World Series opener in Boston on Wednesday night, beating the St. Louis Cardinals 8-1.
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is the force behind a proposed state law that would require mandatory prison time for a firearm offense. The arguments over mandatory minimum prison terms center on whether mandatory sentences actually deter people from committing crimes or take away judicial discretion and further overcrowd prisons.
To celebrate the 10th anniversary of StoryCorps, we revisit Laura Greenberg, who told her daughter Rebecca about her gregarious parents — and her awkward first kiss with Rebecca's father, Carl. Now, it's his turn to share his side of the family story.
A mountain town in Norway has spent all 100 of its winters in the shade. Now that may change. A local artist campaigned to have mirrors placed on a mountainside. When unveiled on Oct. 31, they should drop a patch of sunlight in the town square.
The Vatican has announced it will be engaging in "sporting diplomacy" with a new team. St. Peter's Cricket Club will be made up of priests and seminarians from cricket-loving countries. And the Vatican threw down a challenge to longtime rival the Church of England: Form a team and make it the Anglicans versus the Catholics at Lord's Cricket Ground in London.
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