Morning Edition for Friday, November 15, 2013

Obama Apologizes, Offers Fix To Insurance Cancellations

President Obama has acknowledged the fumbled rollout of his signature health care law has hurt his credibility and that of fellow Democrats. He offered a minor change to the law in hopes of calming Democratic nerves, and beating back bigger changes proposed by House Republicans.
The health care fix announced by President Obama on Thursday may be good news for some consumers, but it creates a big headache for insurance companies and regulators. An insurance industry trade group warns the last-minute change could destabilize the market and lead to higher premiums.
The Philippine disaster is an example why it increasingly makes sense to buy food close to where its needed rather than ship it across the globe. Most U.S. food aid, though, travels to hotspots from U.S. ports. Critics say that wastes time and money.
Nervous over a steep spike in armed robberies, several Oakland, Calif., neighborhoods have pooled funds to hire private security patrols. And while some residents feel safer, others worry that there is no one policing the private police force.

In France, Some Ask If Racism Is On The Rise

France is deep in debate, wondering if there's a resurgence of an old, colonial racism, or if people have just become more tolerant of bigots.The questions stem from a series of race-based taunts against Justice Minister Christiane Taubira, who is black.
Day after day, workers at Michigan State University care for and feed colonies of evolving bacteria. The original microbes have produced more than 50,000 generations in the 25 years since the experiment began. Despite predictions the bacteria might someday reach a point where they would evolve no more, the results show they keep changing.
Scientists suspect that warming air and rivers, as well as smaller winter snowpack, is endangering western trout. But on a ranch in Montana, methods to protect trout from the effects of cattle ranching are helping the trout become more resilient to the inevitable change in their environment.

Lockheed Martin To Close Plants, Layoff Workers

Lockheed Martin says it's forced to reduce costs as federal defense spending declines. The nation's largest military contractor announced plans on Thursday to eliminate 4,000 jobs over the next year and a half. It also plans to close plants in several states including California, Pennsylvania and Ohio.
Google has prevailed in a long-running lawsuit over the millions of books the company has digitally scanned without permission from authors and publishers. A U.S. Circuit Court judge has ruled that it's "fair use" when Google scans portions of books for public to use.

Game Consoles Marketed As Multimedia Living Room Boxes

PlayStation 4 is out, and next week, the new Xbox is released. These systems do a whole lot more than just play video games. Microsoft in particular is selling non-gamers on its system's television features. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Christopher Grant, editor-in-chief of the video game website Polygon.

Maker Of 'Candy Crush' Is A Sweet Place To Work

Many have become addicted to this online game. The app has become one of the most popular on-the-go games in its first year. And it seems even working for Candy Crush is addictive. King, the game's developer, has been voted the best place to work in Sweden, according to a new survey.

House To Vote On GOP Solution To Canceled Insurance

After weeks of mounting calls to help Americans whose health plans were getting canceled, President Obama announced a fix on Thursday. People can retain their health coverage for a year, even if they've received cancellation notices. On Friday, members of the House are scheduled to vote on a bill that would allow people with individual plans to keep them for as long as they like.
Medicare has tied incentive payments and penalties to two-dozen quality measurements, including surveys of patient satisfaction and death rates. More than 1,200 hospitals are receiving bonuses. But more hospitals are being paid less for each Medicare patient they treat for the year that began Oct. 1.
It's been one week since the typhoon that destroyed most of the city of Tacloban in the eastern Philippines. People there are still in need of the basics like food, water and shelter. Almost every business in the city was shut down by the storm.

Making New Connections On A Trapped Subway Train

Laura Lane was heading to work when her train got stuck. Conductor Paquita Williams was soon walking through the cars, putting passengers at ease in the darkness. Laura was so impressed with how Paquita handled the two-hour ordeal, she wanted to learn more about her.

Kansas City Chiefs Are NFL's Only Undefeated Team

The undefeated Kansas City Chiefs will be tested this Sunday when they meet the Denver Broncos. The Broncos have lost only one game this season. It's one of several key match-ups in week 11 of the NFL.

Sen. Graham Holds Up Confirmations Over Benghazi Attack

South Carolina Senator Lindsay Graham is often criticized by Tea Party oriented Republicans on issues like immigration. There is, however, one topic that is endearing him to conservatives: Benghazi. Graham has vowed to block administration nominations in the Senate until Congress is allowed to interview survivors from last year's attack on the U.S. mission in Libya by armed militants.

What's A Bubble?

Two Nobel laureates disagree on a basic economic question: Is it possible to reliably spot bubbles before they burst?

Devastated Philippine City No Stranger To Calamity

Novelist Gina Apostol grew up in Tacloban before moving to America. She has relatives in cities near Tacloban, who have been making their way to the shattered area to try to help other family members. She says her family worries about the law and order situation there.

Philippines Has A 'Love-Hate Relationship' With U.S.

The U.S. relationship with the Philippines goes way back. University of Hawaii Professor Patricio Abinales, who was born in the Philippines, tells Steve Inskeep his country's love-hate relationship with the U.S. began in the late 19th century after America purchased the islands from Spain.

Bruce Dern's 'Transcendent Performance' In 'Nebraska'

It's the letter everyone's received. The one that says you've won $1 million but is actually about selling magazine subscriptions. But what if someone truly believed they'd won that million? And what if that individual was your cranky father and he insisted on going to prize headquarters to collect his money.

China Expected To Loosen One-Child Policy

A state-run news service says the government will make a big change to the policy designed to restrain population growth. That policy has also led to a relative shortfall of young people and especially of girls.
The Swedish furniture store Ikea is sending a $2.6 million aid package. China is sending aid worth $1.6 million. It first offered $100,000.
The nightmare would be a repeat of last season's 34 minute blackout in New Orleans. The company installed three power lines, any one of which could run the event.

Researchers Figure Out Found Clam Was 507 Years Old

A mollusk named Ming was that old when it was dredged up in the ocean off Iceland several years ago. It was named Ming in honor of the Chinese dynasty it was born into.
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