Morning Edition for Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Putin Moves Foward With Plans To Annex Crimea

Host David Greene speaks with NPR's Gregory Warner about Russian President Vladimir Putin's approval of a draft treaty to annex Crimea.

Has Crimea Referendum Sparked A New Cold War?

Host Renee Montagne talks with New York Times correspondent Ellen Barry in Moscow about what Vladimir Putin's land grab in Ukraine says about this moment in the post-Soviet history of Russia.
In the 1980s, NASA engineer Robert Farquhar came up with a sly plan to divert the ISEE-3 satellite from its original path to visit a comet instead. Now Farquhar has another big plan for his "baby."

BrusselKale: A Match Made In Heaven

A U.K. seed company has taken the leafy look and peppery taste of kale and added the flavor of Brussels sprouts. You can buy BrusselKale now in Ohio and Pennsylvania; it debuts nationally this fall.

South Africans Engrossed By Pistorius Trial

Host Renee Montagne talks to Erin Conway-Smith, southern Africa editor for GlobalPost, about the murder trial of Olympic hero Oscar Pistorius.
David Greene talks to Democratic Sen. Richard Durbin of Illinois about his recent trip to Ukraine and U.S. options for dealing with the crisis in the wake of Sunday's referendum in Crimea.
For the first time, Scots will be able to vote on whether they want to remain part of the United Kingdom or strike out on their own. So far, polls suggest most favor unity over independence.
British clothing retailer Primark says it will pay $10 million in compensation to the victims of the Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh last year. The tragedy killed more than 1,100.
Silicon Valley companies have launched a drive to provide citizenship services on-site to employees holding green cards. The belief is that such employees become more valuable workers.

Investors Pool Money Online To Buy Real Estate

The crowdfunding trend — where people donate money through sites like Kickstarter to back projects — has grown quickly. Now investors are pooling their money online to buy real estate.
Kevin Trudeau was sentenced Monday to 10 years in prison for deceiving consumers through his late-night infomercials. In sentencing Trudeau, a federal judge called him "deceitful to the very core."
A federal court has thrown out a policy in San Diego that placed tight restrictions on who can carry concealed weapons in public. As other courts consider such rules, the Supreme Court could weigh in.
Colorado spent years and millions of dollars creating its own health insurance marketplace. While enrollment hasn't met expectations, the backers of the exchange still support it.
In the decades following World War II, many American families had a lot of help paying for a college education. But in the 1970s, inflation spiked and public policies began to change.
Host David Greene shares a clip from a Tell Me More conversation about getting information to lower-income students about college admissions and financial aid.

Red Robin Adds New Adult Milkshake To Menu

A new offering from the food chain Red Robin: milkshakes made with wine. The first wine shake on the menu will be the Mango Moscato — made with wine, vodka, mango puree and vanilla ice cream.
The stock market surge has given a lift to many retirement portfolios. But a new report finds what's been true for years: Most Americans haven't saved nearly enough for the kind of retirement they expect.
More than 600,000 Afghans are living in scores of camps around the country and say they can't return home because it's too dangerous. Their numbers have risen sharply in the past year.
President Obama will award Medals of Honor to two dozen soldiers at the White House on Tuesday. One of them is Santiago Erevia, who risked his life in May 1969 when he charged four North Vietnamese bunkers.
Physicists say they've discovered a faint signal from just moments after the universe began. If confirmed, it could revolutionize our understanding of the cosmos. But not everyone is convinced.
Eight hundred years ago, tea traveled to Japan from China in simple, ceramic storage jars. These ancient jugs, now on display in Washington, D.C., helped launch Japan's tea culture.
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